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Natural products for cancer chemotherapy.

Demain AL, Vaishnav P - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Bottom Line: A vast array of biological metabolites can be obtained from the marine world, which can be used for effective cancer treatment.In addition, the high toxicity usually associated with some cancer chemotherapy drugs and their undesirable side-effects increase the demand for novel anti-tumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side-effects and/or with greater therapeutic efficiency.This review points out those technologies needed to produce the anti-tumour compounds of the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charles A Dana Research Institute for Scientists Emeriti, Drew University, Madison, NJ 07940, USA. ademain@drew.edu

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Structures of some anti‐tumour agents with clinical application. Reprinted from Salas and Mendez (1998) with permission.
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f1: Structures of some anti‐tumour agents with clinical application. Reprinted from Salas and Mendez (1998) with permission.

Mentions: In their review on the use of microbes to prescreen potential anti‐tumour compounds, Newman and Shapiro (2008) concluded that microorganisms have played an important role in identifying compounds with therapeutic benefit against cancer. Most of the important compounds used for chemotherapy of tumours are microbially produced antibiotics or their derivatives. Some of the microbial anti‐tumour agents are shown in Table 1. One of the earliest applications of a microbial product was actinomycin D for Wilm's tumour in children. Use of this compound against stage I or stage II Wilm's tumour has resulted in a 90% survival rate (Chung, 2009). The structures of some of the most useful anti‐tumour compounds are shown in Fig. 1 (Salas and Mendez, 1998). Also used for anti‐tumour therapy is the enzyme l‐asparaginase.


Natural products for cancer chemotherapy.

Demain AL, Vaishnav P - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Structures of some anti‐tumour agents with clinical application. Reprinted from Salas and Mendez (1998) with permission.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815406&req=5

f1: Structures of some anti‐tumour agents with clinical application. Reprinted from Salas and Mendez (1998) with permission.
Mentions: In their review on the use of microbes to prescreen potential anti‐tumour compounds, Newman and Shapiro (2008) concluded that microorganisms have played an important role in identifying compounds with therapeutic benefit against cancer. Most of the important compounds used for chemotherapy of tumours are microbially produced antibiotics or their derivatives. Some of the microbial anti‐tumour agents are shown in Table 1. One of the earliest applications of a microbial product was actinomycin D for Wilm's tumour in children. Use of this compound against stage I or stage II Wilm's tumour has resulted in a 90% survival rate (Chung, 2009). The structures of some of the most useful anti‐tumour compounds are shown in Fig. 1 (Salas and Mendez, 1998). Also used for anti‐tumour therapy is the enzyme l‐asparaginase.

Bottom Line: A vast array of biological metabolites can be obtained from the marine world, which can be used for effective cancer treatment.In addition, the high toxicity usually associated with some cancer chemotherapy drugs and their undesirable side-effects increase the demand for novel anti-tumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side-effects and/or with greater therapeutic efficiency.This review points out those technologies needed to produce the anti-tumour compounds of the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charles A Dana Research Institute for Scientists Emeriti, Drew University, Madison, NJ 07940, USA. ademain@drew.edu

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus