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Interkingdom adenosine signal reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity.

Sheng L, Pu M, Hegde M, Zhang Y, Jayaraman A, Wood TK - Microb Biotechnol (2012)

Bottom Line: Since the adenosine metabolite inosine did not affect biofilm formation and since a mutant unable to metabolize adenosine behaved like the wild-type strain, adenosine metabolism is not required to reduce pathogenicity.To provide insights into how adenosine reduces the virulence of P. aeruginosa, a whole-transcriptome analysis was conducted which revealed that adenosine addition represses genes similar to an iron-replete condition; however, adenosine did not directly bind Fur.Therefore, adenosine decreases P. aeruginosa pathogenicity as an interkingdom signal by causing genes related to iron acquisition to be repressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3122, USA.

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Normalized biofilm formation with adenosine and inosine. A and B. Total biofilm formation was assayed at 37°C after 24 h in 96‐well plates without shaking with 10 mM adenosine in LB and M9 glucose media (A) and with 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 mM inosine in LB medium (B). Six wells were used for each strain. To remove growth effects, biofilm formation was normalized by dividing total biofilm by the turbidity at 620 nm for each strain. C. Biofilm formation at 37°C after 6 days in 5% LB with 0 and 10 mM adenosine in flow cells. Two representative IMARIS images of each condition are shown. Scale bars represent 10 µm. Data are from two independent experiments.
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f1: Normalized biofilm formation with adenosine and inosine. A and B. Total biofilm formation was assayed at 37°C after 24 h in 96‐well plates without shaking with 10 mM adenosine in LB and M9 glucose media (A) and with 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 mM inosine in LB medium (B). Six wells were used for each strain. To remove growth effects, biofilm formation was normalized by dividing total biofilm by the turbidity at 620 nm for each strain. C. Biofilm formation at 37°C after 6 days in 5% LB with 0 and 10 mM adenosine in flow cells. Two representative IMARIS images of each condition are shown. Scale bars represent 10 µm. Data are from two independent experiments.

Mentions: The addition of 10 mM adenosine decreased the specific growth rate of PA14 by 25% (1.01 ± 0.06 h−1 versus 1.35 ± 0.01 h−1 for no adenosine) in LB medium. More significantly, 10 mM adenosine nearly abolished static biofilm formation in 96‐well plates (25‐fold decrease) (Fig. 1A). Similarly, adenosine reduced biofilm formation by 2.5‐fold in M9 glucose medium (Fig. 1A). We also investigated whether adenosine could induce biofilm dispersal. However, no significant effect was observed by the addition of adenosine.


Interkingdom adenosine signal reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity.

Sheng L, Pu M, Hegde M, Zhang Y, Jayaraman A, Wood TK - Microb Biotechnol (2012)

Normalized biofilm formation with adenosine and inosine. A and B. Total biofilm formation was assayed at 37°C after 24 h in 96‐well plates without shaking with 10 mM adenosine in LB and M9 glucose media (A) and with 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 mM inosine in LB medium (B). Six wells were used for each strain. To remove growth effects, biofilm formation was normalized by dividing total biofilm by the turbidity at 620 nm for each strain. C. Biofilm formation at 37°C after 6 days in 5% LB with 0 and 10 mM adenosine in flow cells. Two representative IMARIS images of each condition are shown. Scale bars represent 10 µm. Data are from two independent experiments.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815332&req=5

f1: Normalized biofilm formation with adenosine and inosine. A and B. Total biofilm formation was assayed at 37°C after 24 h in 96‐well plates without shaking with 10 mM adenosine in LB and M9 glucose media (A) and with 0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 mM inosine in LB medium (B). Six wells were used for each strain. To remove growth effects, biofilm formation was normalized by dividing total biofilm by the turbidity at 620 nm for each strain. C. Biofilm formation at 37°C after 6 days in 5% LB with 0 and 10 mM adenosine in flow cells. Two representative IMARIS images of each condition are shown. Scale bars represent 10 µm. Data are from two independent experiments.
Mentions: The addition of 10 mM adenosine decreased the specific growth rate of PA14 by 25% (1.01 ± 0.06 h−1 versus 1.35 ± 0.01 h−1 for no adenosine) in LB medium. More significantly, 10 mM adenosine nearly abolished static biofilm formation in 96‐well plates (25‐fold decrease) (Fig. 1A). Similarly, adenosine reduced biofilm formation by 2.5‐fold in M9 glucose medium (Fig. 1A). We also investigated whether adenosine could induce biofilm dispersal. However, no significant effect was observed by the addition of adenosine.

Bottom Line: Since the adenosine metabolite inosine did not affect biofilm formation and since a mutant unable to metabolize adenosine behaved like the wild-type strain, adenosine metabolism is not required to reduce pathogenicity.To provide insights into how adenosine reduces the virulence of P. aeruginosa, a whole-transcriptome analysis was conducted which revealed that adenosine addition represses genes similar to an iron-replete condition; however, adenosine did not directly bind Fur.Therefore, adenosine decreases P. aeruginosa pathogenicity as an interkingdom signal by causing genes related to iron acquisition to be repressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3122, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus