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A bacterial reporter panel for the detection and classification of antibiotic substances.

Melamed S, Lalush C, Elad T, Yagur-Kroll S, Belkin S, Pedahzur R - Microb Biotechnol (2012)

Bottom Line: The ever-growing use of pharmaceutical compounds, including antibacterial substances, poses a substantial pollution load on the environment.All of the tested antibiotics were detected by the panel, which displayed different response patterns for each substance.These unique responses were analysed by several algorithms that enabled clustering the compounds according to their functional properties, and allowed the classification of unknown antibiotic substances with a high degree of accuracy and confidence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Maximal induction of soxS:luxCDABE by tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol (A) and of micF:luxCDABE by sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and colistin (B) after 8 h of exposure. (C) Bioluminescent signal development of micF:luxCDABE induction by sulfamethoxazole (20 µg ml−1) and colistin (0.38 µg ml−1) as a function of time. (D) Maximal induction of emrA:luxCDABE by ampicillin and amoxicillin after 8 h of exposure. (E) Bioluminescent signal development of recA:luxCDABE by nalidixic acid as a function of time. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean of three independent repeats.
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f2: Maximal induction of soxS:luxCDABE by tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol (A) and of micF:luxCDABE by sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and colistin (B) after 8 h of exposure. (C) Bioluminescent signal development of micF:luxCDABE induction by sulfamethoxazole (20 µg ml−1) and colistin (0.38 µg ml−1) as a function of time. (D) Maximal induction of emrA:luxCDABE by ampicillin and amoxicillin after 8 h of exposure. (E) Bioluminescent signal development of recA:luxCDABE by nalidixic acid as a function of time. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean of three independent repeats.

Mentions: The results show that all promoters were induced by all of the tested antibiotics, exhibiting several response patterns. Figure 2 presents several examples of these responses; one is the strong induction of soxS:luxCDABE in response to tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol, all protein synthesis interfering antibiotics (Fig. 2A). The activation of the soxS gene, normally recognized for its regulatory role in the defence against superoxide radicals (Nunoshiba et al., 1992), is in agreement with previous reports that presented this gene as part of a regulon involved in antibiotic resistance (Griffith et al., 2005; Lee et al., 2009). Its induction might be explained by oxidative damage caused by the possible accumulation of abnormal proteins in the presence of these antibiotics.


A bacterial reporter panel for the detection and classification of antibiotic substances.

Melamed S, Lalush C, Elad T, Yagur-Kroll S, Belkin S, Pedahzur R - Microb Biotechnol (2012)

Maximal induction of soxS:luxCDABE by tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol (A) and of micF:luxCDABE by sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and colistin (B) after 8 h of exposure. (C) Bioluminescent signal development of micF:luxCDABE induction by sulfamethoxazole (20 µg ml−1) and colistin (0.38 µg ml−1) as a function of time. (D) Maximal induction of emrA:luxCDABE by ampicillin and amoxicillin after 8 h of exposure. (E) Bioluminescent signal development of recA:luxCDABE by nalidixic acid as a function of time. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean of three independent repeats.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815330&req=5

f2: Maximal induction of soxS:luxCDABE by tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol (A) and of micF:luxCDABE by sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and colistin (B) after 8 h of exposure. (C) Bioluminescent signal development of micF:luxCDABE induction by sulfamethoxazole (20 µg ml−1) and colistin (0.38 µg ml−1) as a function of time. (D) Maximal induction of emrA:luxCDABE by ampicillin and amoxicillin after 8 h of exposure. (E) Bioluminescent signal development of recA:luxCDABE by nalidixic acid as a function of time. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean of three independent repeats.
Mentions: The results show that all promoters were induced by all of the tested antibiotics, exhibiting several response patterns. Figure 2 presents several examples of these responses; one is the strong induction of soxS:luxCDABE in response to tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chloramphenicol, all protein synthesis interfering antibiotics (Fig. 2A). The activation of the soxS gene, normally recognized for its regulatory role in the defence against superoxide radicals (Nunoshiba et al., 1992), is in agreement with previous reports that presented this gene as part of a regulon involved in antibiotic resistance (Griffith et al., 2005; Lee et al., 2009). Its induction might be explained by oxidative damage caused by the possible accumulation of abnormal proteins in the presence of these antibiotics.

Bottom Line: The ever-growing use of pharmaceutical compounds, including antibacterial substances, poses a substantial pollution load on the environment.All of the tested antibiotics were detected by the panel, which displayed different response patterns for each substance.These unique responses were analysed by several algorithms that enabled clustering the compounds according to their functional properties, and allowed the classification of unknown antibiotic substances with a high degree of accuracy and confidence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus