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High shear enrichment improves the performance of the anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell.

Pham HT, Boon N, Aelterman P, Clauwaert P, De Schamphelaire L, van Oostveldt P, Verbeken K, Rabaey K, Verstraete W - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

Bottom Line: In many microbial bioreactors, high shear rates result in strong attachment of microbes and dense biofilms.The microbial community of the former, as analysed by DGGE, was significantly different from that of the latter.The results showed that enrichment by applying high shear rates in an MFC can result in a specific electrochemically active biofilm that is thicker and denser and attaches better, and hence has a better performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

DGGE analysis of the anodic microbial communities in the high shear enriched MFC (High shear) and the low shear enriched MFC (Control) and blast analysis results of the DGGE fragment sequences of the major species of the two communities. The DGGE was repeated three times with three samples collected from three different anodic electrode graphite plates of each reactor. As the results of these repetitions were absolutely similar, only typical patterns were shown here. Percentage numbers indicate the highest corresponding levels of homology of the sequences in comparison with sequences in the Genebank database.
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f5: DGGE analysis of the anodic microbial communities in the high shear enriched MFC (High shear) and the low shear enriched MFC (Control) and blast analysis results of the DGGE fragment sequences of the major species of the two communities. The DGGE was repeated three times with three samples collected from three different anodic electrode graphite plates of each reactor. As the results of these repetitions were absolutely similar, only typical patterns were shown here. Percentage numbers indicate the highest corresponding levels of homology of the sequences in comparison with sequences in the Genebank database.

Mentions: The DGGE and sequencing analysis of the bacterial communities showed that the anodic microbial community of the high shear enriched MFC was very different from that of the low shear enriched MFC (Fig. 5), although both had some abundantly present species in common: Phyllobacterium and Pseudomonas sp. (corresponding to bands 6 and 7). Some species (corresponding to bands 1, 8–11, especially) were only dominant in the community of the high shear enriched MFC, not in the community of the low shear enriched MFC and vice versa. Interestingly, most of characteristic dominant species of the community of the high shear enriched MFC only showed very low sequence homology (< 96%) even though the sequence length was short (200 bp). On the contrary, most of dominant species of the community of the low shear enriched MFC could be determined as known bacteria (with blast sequence homology > 96%).


High shear enrichment improves the performance of the anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell.

Pham HT, Boon N, Aelterman P, Clauwaert P, De Schamphelaire L, van Oostveldt P, Verbeken K, Rabaey K, Verstraete W - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

DGGE analysis of the anodic microbial communities in the high shear enriched MFC (High shear) and the low shear enriched MFC (Control) and blast analysis results of the DGGE fragment sequences of the major species of the two communities. The DGGE was repeated three times with three samples collected from three different anodic electrode graphite plates of each reactor. As the results of these repetitions were absolutely similar, only typical patterns were shown here. Percentage numbers indicate the highest corresponding levels of homology of the sequences in comparison with sequences in the Genebank database.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815290&req=5

f5: DGGE analysis of the anodic microbial communities in the high shear enriched MFC (High shear) and the low shear enriched MFC (Control) and blast analysis results of the DGGE fragment sequences of the major species of the two communities. The DGGE was repeated three times with three samples collected from three different anodic electrode graphite plates of each reactor. As the results of these repetitions were absolutely similar, only typical patterns were shown here. Percentage numbers indicate the highest corresponding levels of homology of the sequences in comparison with sequences in the Genebank database.
Mentions: The DGGE and sequencing analysis of the bacterial communities showed that the anodic microbial community of the high shear enriched MFC was very different from that of the low shear enriched MFC (Fig. 5), although both had some abundantly present species in common: Phyllobacterium and Pseudomonas sp. (corresponding to bands 6 and 7). Some species (corresponding to bands 1, 8–11, especially) were only dominant in the community of the high shear enriched MFC, not in the community of the low shear enriched MFC and vice versa. Interestingly, most of characteristic dominant species of the community of the high shear enriched MFC only showed very low sequence homology (< 96%) even though the sequence length was short (200 bp). On the contrary, most of dominant species of the community of the low shear enriched MFC could be determined as known bacteria (with blast sequence homology > 96%).

Bottom Line: In many microbial bioreactors, high shear rates result in strong attachment of microbes and dense biofilms.The microbial community of the former, as analysed by DGGE, was significantly different from that of the latter.The results showed that enrichment by applying high shear rates in an MFC can result in a specific electrochemically active biofilm that is thicker and denser and attaches better, and hence has a better performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus