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Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

Zhang D, He Y, Wang Y, Wang H, Wu L, Aries E, Huang WE - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets.So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18.This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ, UK.

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ADPWH_alk response to crude oil in soils.
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f6: ADPWH_alk response to crude oil in soils.

Mentions: ADPWH_alk induction ratios increased in response to higher concentrations of mineral, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in the range of 0.1–100 mg l−1 in a semi‐quantitative manner (Fig. 5), and the detection limit (0.1 mg l−1) was equivalent to the US EPA crude oil contamination limit (US EPA water standard and gold book). Optimal time of ADPWH_alk for oil quantitative estimation was 200–240 min. The three crudes tested were typical oils, and Brent crude was a standard crude oil used by world oil trade. Although the mineral oil and crude oils are consist of a mixture of alkanes and alkenes with different compositions, ADPWH_alk induction patterns to different oils were similar (Fig. 5), which suggested that a single general calibration curve was sufficient to estimate the oil concentration in water in practice. ADPWH_alk induction in seawater and in pure water was similar, indicating that seawater had little impact on the bioreporter's performance and that ADPWH_alk could be applied to detect oil spill in seawater. A curve of ADPWH_alk induction ratio against crude oil contents in a standard soil was plotted in Fig. 6, which shows that the induction ratio increased with higher contents of crude oil in soils. On the one hand, the more soil added into the bioreporter, the more accuracy of the estimation. On the other hand, less amount of soil would be desirable since soil would interfere with the bioreporter induction measurement by blocking the bioluminescence light. Hence, in Fig. 6, each measurement point was present at its optimal condition which was identified as the maximum bioreporter induction ratio with the minimal soil content. This problem can be overcome by applying magnetic functionalized nanoparticles to the bioreporter (Zhang et al., 2011).


Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

Zhang D, He Y, Wang Y, Wang H, Wu L, Aries E, Huang WE - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

ADPWH_alk response to crude oil in soils.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815275&req=5

f6: ADPWH_alk response to crude oil in soils.
Mentions: ADPWH_alk induction ratios increased in response to higher concentrations of mineral, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in the range of 0.1–100 mg l−1 in a semi‐quantitative manner (Fig. 5), and the detection limit (0.1 mg l−1) was equivalent to the US EPA crude oil contamination limit (US EPA water standard and gold book). Optimal time of ADPWH_alk for oil quantitative estimation was 200–240 min. The three crudes tested were typical oils, and Brent crude was a standard crude oil used by world oil trade. Although the mineral oil and crude oils are consist of a mixture of alkanes and alkenes with different compositions, ADPWH_alk induction patterns to different oils were similar (Fig. 5), which suggested that a single general calibration curve was sufficient to estimate the oil concentration in water in practice. ADPWH_alk induction in seawater and in pure water was similar, indicating that seawater had little impact on the bioreporter's performance and that ADPWH_alk could be applied to detect oil spill in seawater. A curve of ADPWH_alk induction ratio against crude oil contents in a standard soil was plotted in Fig. 6, which shows that the induction ratio increased with higher contents of crude oil in soils. On the one hand, the more soil added into the bioreporter, the more accuracy of the estimation. On the other hand, less amount of soil would be desirable since soil would interfere with the bioreporter induction measurement by blocking the bioluminescence light. Hence, in Fig. 6, each measurement point was present at its optimal condition which was identified as the maximum bioreporter induction ratio with the minimal soil content. This problem can be overcome by applying magnetic functionalized nanoparticles to the bioreporter (Zhang et al., 2011).

Bottom Line: Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets.So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18.This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ, UK.

Show MeSH