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Characterization of Bacillus subtilis HC8, a novel plant-beneficial endophytic strain from giant hogweed.

Malfanova N, Kamilova F, Validov S, Shcherbakov A, Chebotar V, Tikhonovich I, Lugtenberg B - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: Metabolites possibly responsible for these plant-beneficial properties were identified as the hormone gibberellin and (lipo)peptide antibiotics respectively.However, thin layer chromatography profiles of the two strains differ.It is speculated that endophytes such as B. subtilis HC8 contribute to the fast growth of giant hogweed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leiden University, Institute of Biology, Sylvius Laboratory, Sylviusweg 72, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Plant growth promotion mediated by endophytic bacteria. Seedlings of radish were inoculated with a suspension of bacterial cells except for the control (C) and planted in soil. Each variant consisted of four replicates with five seedlings each. Numbers inside the columns represent the mean fresh weight of the root system scored 31 days after inoculation. Bars indicate confidence interval (P = 0.05). The asterisk indicates a significantly different value.
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f1: Plant growth promotion mediated by endophytic bacteria. Seedlings of radish were inoculated with a suspension of bacterial cells except for the control (C) and planted in soil. Each variant consisted of four replicates with five seedlings each. Numbers inside the columns represent the mean fresh weight of the root system scored 31 days after inoculation. Bars indicate confidence interval (P = 0.05). The asterisk indicates a significantly different value.

Mentions: Four endophytic strains, namely BT18, HC2, HC8 and MZ3, were tested for their ability to promote the growth of radish plants in non‐sterile potting soil (Fig. 1). Radish was chosen as the model plant because its roots secrete a high level of tryptophan (Kamilova et al., 2006), which can be used by many beneficial bacteria as the precursor of auxin. The only tested strain that was able to increase the root weight of radish plants was B. subtilis HC8 (Fig. 1). The root weight was chosen because this is the commercially interesting plant part. Strain HC8 significantly enhanced fresh root biomass, with as much as 46% compared with uninoculated control plants. Inoculation with the auxin‐producing strain R. aquatilis HC2 and with B. subtilis BT18 did not show a significant increase of root growth. B. subtilis strain MZ3 decreased the root biomass, but not significantly.


Characterization of Bacillus subtilis HC8, a novel plant-beneficial endophytic strain from giant hogweed.

Malfanova N, Kamilova F, Validov S, Shcherbakov A, Chebotar V, Tikhonovich I, Lugtenberg B - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Plant growth promotion mediated by endophytic bacteria. Seedlings of radish were inoculated with a suspension of bacterial cells except for the control (C) and planted in soil. Each variant consisted of four replicates with five seedlings each. Numbers inside the columns represent the mean fresh weight of the root system scored 31 days after inoculation. Bars indicate confidence interval (P = 0.05). The asterisk indicates a significantly different value.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815264&req=5

f1: Plant growth promotion mediated by endophytic bacteria. Seedlings of radish were inoculated with a suspension of bacterial cells except for the control (C) and planted in soil. Each variant consisted of four replicates with five seedlings each. Numbers inside the columns represent the mean fresh weight of the root system scored 31 days after inoculation. Bars indicate confidence interval (P = 0.05). The asterisk indicates a significantly different value.
Mentions: Four endophytic strains, namely BT18, HC2, HC8 and MZ3, were tested for their ability to promote the growth of radish plants in non‐sterile potting soil (Fig. 1). Radish was chosen as the model plant because its roots secrete a high level of tryptophan (Kamilova et al., 2006), which can be used by many beneficial bacteria as the precursor of auxin. The only tested strain that was able to increase the root weight of radish plants was B. subtilis HC8 (Fig. 1). The root weight was chosen because this is the commercially interesting plant part. Strain HC8 significantly enhanced fresh root biomass, with as much as 46% compared with uninoculated control plants. Inoculation with the auxin‐producing strain R. aquatilis HC2 and with B. subtilis BT18 did not show a significant increase of root growth. B. subtilis strain MZ3 decreased the root biomass, but not significantly.

Bottom Line: Metabolites possibly responsible for these plant-beneficial properties were identified as the hormone gibberellin and (lipo)peptide antibiotics respectively.However, thin layer chromatography profiles of the two strains differ.It is speculated that endophytes such as B. subtilis HC8 contribute to the fast growth of giant hogweed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leiden University, Institute of Biology, Sylvius Laboratory, Sylviusweg 72, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus