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Small-molecule elicitation of microbial secondary metabolites.

Pettit RK - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Bottom Line: Bacterial and fungal sequencing studies indicate that the biosynthetic potential of many strains is much greater than that observed by fermentation.A targeted approach related to cultivation-based methods is the application of small-molecule elicitors to specifically affect transcription of secondary metabolite gene clusters.With the isolation of the novel secondary metabolites lunalides A and B, oxylipins, cladochromes F and G, nygerone A, chaetoglobosin-542, -540 and -510, sphaerolone, dihydrosphaerolone, mutolide and pestalone, and the enhanced production of known secondary metabolites like penicillin and bacitracin, chemical elicitation is proving to be an effective way to augment natural product libraries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-2404, USA. robin.pettit@asu.edu

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Selected fully sequenced prokaryotic and eukaryotic secondary metabolite producers (Gross, 2009). Dark bars show the numbers of gene clusters known to be present in the genome, based on the number of isolated secondary metabolites at the time of sequencing. Light bars show the total number of gene clusters deduced from whole genome sequence analysis (Used with permission from Harald Gross.).
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f1: Selected fully sequenced prokaryotic and eukaryotic secondary metabolite producers (Gross, 2009). Dark bars show the numbers of gene clusters known to be present in the genome, based on the number of isolated secondary metabolites at the time of sequencing. Light bars show the total number of gene clusters deduced from whole genome sequence analysis (Used with permission from Harald Gross.).

Mentions: Potentially interesting gene clusters, which may encode metabolites that increase competitiveness in natural environments, can remain silent in the unnatural setting of the microbiology laboratory. There are now many examples of bacterial and fungal biosynthetic secondary metabolite gene clusters outnumbering the number of natural products actually synthesized in the laboratory (Gross, 2009) (Fig. 1). These silent (cryptic) gene clusters undoubtedly harbour an enormous reservoir of novel bioactive constituents for drug discovery.


Small-molecule elicitation of microbial secondary metabolites.

Pettit RK - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Selected fully sequenced prokaryotic and eukaryotic secondary metabolite producers (Gross, 2009). Dark bars show the numbers of gene clusters known to be present in the genome, based on the number of isolated secondary metabolites at the time of sequencing. Light bars show the total number of gene clusters deduced from whole genome sequence analysis (Used with permission from Harald Gross.).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815259&req=5

f1: Selected fully sequenced prokaryotic and eukaryotic secondary metabolite producers (Gross, 2009). Dark bars show the numbers of gene clusters known to be present in the genome, based on the number of isolated secondary metabolites at the time of sequencing. Light bars show the total number of gene clusters deduced from whole genome sequence analysis (Used with permission from Harald Gross.).
Mentions: Potentially interesting gene clusters, which may encode metabolites that increase competitiveness in natural environments, can remain silent in the unnatural setting of the microbiology laboratory. There are now many examples of bacterial and fungal biosynthetic secondary metabolite gene clusters outnumbering the number of natural products actually synthesized in the laboratory (Gross, 2009) (Fig. 1). These silent (cryptic) gene clusters undoubtedly harbour an enormous reservoir of novel bioactive constituents for drug discovery.

Bottom Line: Bacterial and fungal sequencing studies indicate that the biosynthetic potential of many strains is much greater than that observed by fermentation.A targeted approach related to cultivation-based methods is the application of small-molecule elicitors to specifically affect transcription of secondary metabolite gene clusters.With the isolation of the novel secondary metabolites lunalides A and B, oxylipins, cladochromes F and G, nygerone A, chaetoglobosin-542, -540 and -510, sphaerolone, dihydrosphaerolone, mutolide and pestalone, and the enhanced production of known secondary metabolites like penicillin and bacitracin, chemical elicitation is proving to be an effective way to augment natural product libraries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-2404, USA. robin.pettit@asu.edu

Show MeSH