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Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia.

Fonjungo PN, Kebede Y, Arneson W, Tefera D, Yimer K, Kinde S, Alem M, Cheneke W, Mitiku H, Tadesse E, Tsegaye A, Kenyon T - Hum Resour Health (2013)

Bottom Line: The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce.A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum.University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. pdf4@cdc.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases.

Methods: An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education.

Results: A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation.

Conclusions: Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system.

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Location of the five university sites for preservice laboratory education strengthening in Ethiopia. Circle in green denotes the location of a university and close to each circle is the name of the university in red. The names of the different geographic regions in Ethiopia are shown in black. SNNPR represents Southern Nations, Nationalities and People’s Region.
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Figure 1: Location of the five university sites for preservice laboratory education strengthening in Ethiopia. Circle in green denotes the location of a university and close to each circle is the name of the university in red. The names of the different geographic regions in Ethiopia are shown in black. SNNPR represents Southern Nations, Nationalities and People’s Region.

Mentions: In 2008, CDC Ethiopia, in collaboration with faculty staff of five universities with medical laboratory technology training schools, conducted a joint assessment of medical laboratory education. The preservice laboratory education strengthening program activity was carried out at all five public universities with medical laboratory technologist training schools throughout Ethiopia (Figure 1). The universities involved were Addis Ababa University, University of Gondar, Jimma University, Hawassa University and Haramaya University. The medical laboratory training schools offered undergraduate (BSc) and postgraduate (MSc) courses. The assessment focused on the curriculum, communications and teaching materials, teaching methods and inventory of laboratory equipment. There were regular meetings held and representatives of all the five universities met to share, discuss and prioritize gaps in training that were revealed by the assessment report. Addis Ababa University medical laboratory school chaired the forum of the five universities and also served as a bridge among CDC Ethiopia, American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) and the other universities. ASCP, one of CDC Ethiopia’s implementing partners also conducted site visits to two of the five university based laboratory schools in 2007 to provide baseline assessment data.


Preservice laboratory education strengthening enhances sustainable laboratory workforce in Ethiopia.

Fonjungo PN, Kebede Y, Arneson W, Tefera D, Yimer K, Kinde S, Alem M, Cheneke W, Mitiku H, Tadesse E, Tsegaye A, Kenyon T - Hum Resour Health (2013)

Location of the five university sites for preservice laboratory education strengthening in Ethiopia. Circle in green denotes the location of a university and close to each circle is the name of the university in red. The names of the different geographic regions in Ethiopia are shown in black. SNNPR represents Southern Nations, Nationalities and People’s Region.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815253&req=5

Figure 1: Location of the five university sites for preservice laboratory education strengthening in Ethiopia. Circle in green denotes the location of a university and close to each circle is the name of the university in red. The names of the different geographic regions in Ethiopia are shown in black. SNNPR represents Southern Nations, Nationalities and People’s Region.
Mentions: In 2008, CDC Ethiopia, in collaboration with faculty staff of five universities with medical laboratory technology training schools, conducted a joint assessment of medical laboratory education. The preservice laboratory education strengthening program activity was carried out at all five public universities with medical laboratory technologist training schools throughout Ethiopia (Figure 1). The universities involved were Addis Ababa University, University of Gondar, Jimma University, Hawassa University and Haramaya University. The medical laboratory training schools offered undergraduate (BSc) and postgraduate (MSc) courses. The assessment focused on the curriculum, communications and teaching materials, teaching methods and inventory of laboratory equipment. There were regular meetings held and representatives of all the five universities met to share, discuss and prioritize gaps in training that were revealed by the assessment report. Addis Ababa University medical laboratory school chaired the forum of the five universities and also served as a bridge among CDC Ethiopia, American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) and the other universities. ASCP, one of CDC Ethiopia’s implementing partners also conducted site visits to two of the five university based laboratory schools in 2007 to provide baseline assessment data.

Bottom Line: The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce.A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum.University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. pdf4@cdc.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a severe healthcare workforce shortage in sub Saharan Africa, which threatens achieving the Millennium Development Goals and attaining an AIDS-free generation. The strength of a healthcare system depends on the skills, competencies, values and availability of its workforce. A well-trained and competent laboratory technologist ensures accurate and reliable results for use in prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of diseases.

Methods: An assessment of existing preservice education of five medical laboratory schools, followed by remedial intervention and monitoring was conducted. The remedial interventions included 1) standardizing curriculum and implementation; 2) training faculty staff on pedagogical methods and quality management systems; 3) providing teaching materials; and 4) procuring equipment for teaching laboratories to provide practical skills to complement didactic education.

Results: A total of 2,230 undergraduate students from the five universities benefitted from the standardized curriculum. University of Gondar accounted for 252 of 2,230 (11.3%) of the students, Addis Ababa University for 663 (29.7%), Jimma University for 649 (29.1%), Haramaya University for 429 (19.2%) and Hawassa University for 237 (10.6%) of the students. Together the universities graduated 388 and 312 laboratory technologists in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic year, respectively. Practical hands-on training and experience with well-equipped laboratories enhanced and ensured skilled, confident and competent laboratory technologists upon graduation.

Conclusions: Strengthening preservice laboratory education is feasible in resource-limited settings, and emphasizing its merits (ample local capacity, country ownership and sustainability) provides a valuable source of competent laboratory technologists to relieve an overstretched healthcare system.

Show MeSH