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Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

Hutchison JR, Dukovcic SR, Dierksen KP, Carlyle CA, Caldwell BA, Trempy JE - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

Bottom Line: Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis.Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum.Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804, USA.

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(A) B. splendens erythrophore cell response after 6 h exposure to bacterial isolate. A negative change in pigment area is indicative of intracellular pigment aggregation whereas a positive change in pigment area represents pigment dispersion. (●) C. botulinum NCTC 7272; (◆) C. botulinum NCTC 7273; (▴) BHI medium. Data represent the mean values of three trials. (B) and (C) B. splendens erythrophore cells at 100×, the size bar represents a length of 100 µm; Left, time = 0 h, Right, time = 6 h, exposure to: (B) BHI medium, (C) C. botulinum NCTC 7272.
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f3: (A) B. splendens erythrophore cell response after 6 h exposure to bacterial isolate. A negative change in pigment area is indicative of intracellular pigment aggregation whereas a positive change in pigment area represents pigment dispersion. (●) C. botulinum NCTC 7272; (◆) C. botulinum NCTC 7273; (▴) BHI medium. Data represent the mean values of three trials. (B) and (C) B. splendens erythrophore cells at 100×, the size bar represents a length of 100 µm; Left, time = 0 h, Right, time = 6 h, exposure to: (B) BHI medium, (C) C. botulinum NCTC 7272.

Mentions: Clostridium botulinum was chosen as a second representative of a Gram‐positive, spore forming, yet anaerobic bacterium associated with food contamination and potential use as a biological weapon. Erythrophore cells were challenged with C. botulinum NCTC 7272 (Type A) or C. botulinum NCTC 7273 (Type B) cultured in BHI. Erythrophore cell response was monitored for 1 h. Very little response to C. botulinum was observed during this hour; therefore monitoring time was extended to 6 h. Two hours after exposure to C. botulinum NCTC 7272 or NCTC 7273, pigment organelles began to slowly aggregate (Fig. 3A) and aggregation of pigment organelles was complete at approximately 5 h. The erythrophore response to both C. botulinum cultures was statistically significant compared with the negative control (BHI) (C. botulinum NCTC 7272 P < 0.005 and C. botulinum NCTC 7273 P < 0.006 respectively). The observed morphological changes of the erythrophore cells were unique from changes induced by other bacterial pathogens. Extensive dendrite formation was observed in erythrophore cells treated with C. botulinum (Fig. 3C), while other bacterial pathogens induced pigment organelles to centrally localize within the erythrophore cell (Fig. 1C).


Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

Hutchison JR, Dukovcic SR, Dierksen KP, Carlyle CA, Caldwell BA, Trempy JE - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

(A) B. splendens erythrophore cell response after 6 h exposure to bacterial isolate. A negative change in pigment area is indicative of intracellular pigment aggregation whereas a positive change in pigment area represents pigment dispersion. (●) C. botulinum NCTC 7272; (◆) C. botulinum NCTC 7273; (▴) BHI medium. Data represent the mean values of three trials. (B) and (C) B. splendens erythrophore cells at 100×, the size bar represents a length of 100 µm; Left, time = 0 h, Right, time = 6 h, exposure to: (B) BHI medium, (C) C. botulinum NCTC 7272.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f3: (A) B. splendens erythrophore cell response after 6 h exposure to bacterial isolate. A negative change in pigment area is indicative of intracellular pigment aggregation whereas a positive change in pigment area represents pigment dispersion. (●) C. botulinum NCTC 7272; (◆) C. botulinum NCTC 7273; (▴) BHI medium. Data represent the mean values of three trials. (B) and (C) B. splendens erythrophore cells at 100×, the size bar represents a length of 100 µm; Left, time = 0 h, Right, time = 6 h, exposure to: (B) BHI medium, (C) C. botulinum NCTC 7272.
Mentions: Clostridium botulinum was chosen as a second representative of a Gram‐positive, spore forming, yet anaerobic bacterium associated with food contamination and potential use as a biological weapon. Erythrophore cells were challenged with C. botulinum NCTC 7272 (Type A) or C. botulinum NCTC 7273 (Type B) cultured in BHI. Erythrophore cell response was monitored for 1 h. Very little response to C. botulinum was observed during this hour; therefore monitoring time was extended to 6 h. Two hours after exposure to C. botulinum NCTC 7272 or NCTC 7273, pigment organelles began to slowly aggregate (Fig. 3A) and aggregation of pigment organelles was complete at approximately 5 h. The erythrophore response to both C. botulinum cultures was statistically significant compared with the negative control (BHI) (C. botulinum NCTC 7272 P < 0.005 and C. botulinum NCTC 7273 P < 0.006 respectively). The observed morphological changes of the erythrophore cells were unique from changes induced by other bacterial pathogens. Extensive dendrite formation was observed in erythrophore cells treated with C. botulinum (Fig. 3C), while other bacterial pathogens induced pigment organelles to centrally localize within the erythrophore cell (Fig. 1C).

Bottom Line: Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis.Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum.Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus