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Motivation for a health-literate health care system--does socioeconomic status play a substantial role? Implications for an Irish health policymaker.

Coughlan D, Turner B, Trujillo A - J Health Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: In this article, the authors argue that the association between socioeconomic status and motivation for a health-literate health care system has implications for health policymakers.Of the 12,513 pooled respondents, 46% sought at least 1 attribute on a health-literate health care system.The concentration curve, for 2002 data, graphically showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system is spread equally across the income distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Economics , National University of Ireland , Galway , Galway , Ireland.

ABSTRACT
In this article, the authors argue that the association between socioeconomic status and motivation for a health-literate health care system has implications for health policymakers. As Ireland now undergoes health care reform, the authors pose the question, "Should policymakers invest in health literacy as predominately a health inequalities or a public health issue?" Data from 2 cohorts of the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (1998 and 2002) were used to construct a motivation for a health-literate health care system variable. Multivariate logistic regressions and concentration curves were used in the analyses of this variable. Of the 12,513 pooled respondents, 46% sought at least 1 attribute on a health-literate health care system. No discernible trend emerged from the main independent variables-social class grouping, medical card eligibility, level of education, and employment-in the regression analyses. The concentration curve, for 2002 data, graphically showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system is spread equally across the income distribution. This analysis and more recent data suggest that health literacy in Ireland should be viewed predominately as a public health issue with a policy focus at a system level.

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Concentration curve: Desire for a health-literate health care system (2002 SLAN data only).
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Figure 2: Concentration curve: Desire for a health-literate health care system (2002 SLAN data only).

Mentions: The concentration curve (Figure 2) showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system had a very slight pro-poor bias and that the concentration index (−0.013) was very close to equality (zero). This suggests that the motivation for a health-literate health care system was seen across the socioeconomic status of this nationally representative sample.


Motivation for a health-literate health care system--does socioeconomic status play a substantial role? Implications for an Irish health policymaker.

Coughlan D, Turner B, Trujillo A - J Health Commun (2013)

Concentration curve: Desire for a health-literate health care system (2002 SLAN data only).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815196&req=5

Figure 2: Concentration curve: Desire for a health-literate health care system (2002 SLAN data only).
Mentions: The concentration curve (Figure 2) showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system had a very slight pro-poor bias and that the concentration index (−0.013) was very close to equality (zero). This suggests that the motivation for a health-literate health care system was seen across the socioeconomic status of this nationally representative sample.

Bottom Line: In this article, the authors argue that the association between socioeconomic status and motivation for a health-literate health care system has implications for health policymakers.Of the 12,513 pooled respondents, 46% sought at least 1 attribute on a health-literate health care system.The concentration curve, for 2002 data, graphically showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system is spread equally across the income distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Economics , National University of Ireland , Galway , Galway , Ireland.

ABSTRACT
In this article, the authors argue that the association between socioeconomic status and motivation for a health-literate health care system has implications for health policymakers. As Ireland now undergoes health care reform, the authors pose the question, "Should policymakers invest in health literacy as predominately a health inequalities or a public health issue?" Data from 2 cohorts of the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (1998 and 2002) were used to construct a motivation for a health-literate health care system variable. Multivariate logistic regressions and concentration curves were used in the analyses of this variable. Of the 12,513 pooled respondents, 46% sought at least 1 attribute on a health-literate health care system. No discernible trend emerged from the main independent variables-social class grouping, medical card eligibility, level of education, and employment-in the regression analyses. The concentration curve, for 2002 data, graphically showed that the motivation for a health-literate health care system is spread equally across the income distribution. This analysis and more recent data suggest that health literacy in Ireland should be viewed predominately as a public health issue with a policy focus at a system level.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus