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Successional distance between the source and recipient influence seed germination and seedling survival during surface soil replacement in SW China.

Shen YX, Gao L, Xia X, Li Y, Guan H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: However, heretofore no study has considered the effect of "successional distance" between source and recipient site.Ten 1 m ×1m soil quadrats in the grass, shrub and young forest sites were replaced with 10 cm deep soil sources from corresponding later successional stage(s) in January 2009.Our results, although based on an unreplicated chronosequence, suggest that successional distance between soil sources and recipient sites affect forest recruitment and restoration in degraded karst of SW China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Yunnan, P.R. China ; Restoration Ecology Group, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Adding propagules (source) to a degraded site (recipient) is a common way of manipulating secondary succession to restore diversity and services formerly provided by forests. However, heretofore no study has considered the effect of "successional distance" between source and recipient site. Four sites in the Shilin karst area of SW China were treated as different states along a secondary successional sere: grass, shrub, young secondary forest, and primary forest. Ten 1 m ×1m soil quadrats in the grass, shrub and young forest sites were replaced with 10 cm deep soil sources from corresponding later successional stage(s) in January 2009. Woody plant seed germination was monitored in the first year and seedling survival was monitored until the end of the second year. At the end of 2010, 2097 seeds of woody plants belonging to 45 taxa had germinated, and 3.9% of the seedlings and 7.8% of the species survived. Germination of most species was sensitive to ambient light (red, far-red, R:FR ratios, photosynthetically active radiation). Soil source and recipient site had a significant effect on the total number of seeds and number of species that germinated, and on the percentage of seedlings that survived through the end of the second year. Closer successional stages between recipient site and soil source had higher seed germination and seedling-survival percentages. However, a transition threshold exists in the young forest state, where seeds can germinate but not survive the second year. Our results, although based on an unreplicated chronosequence, suggest that successional distance between soil sources and recipient sites affect forest recruitment and restoration in degraded karst of SW China.

Show MeSH
Cumulative survival percentages (mean ± SE) per m2 of the number of species (a) at different recipient sites and (b) from different soil sources, and of the number of seedlings (c) at different recipient sites and (d) from different soil sources at different months of the second year after soil (10 cm depth of 1 m ×1m sample) at earlier successional stages were replaced by soil of the later successional stage.Grass, shrub, secondary forest and primary forest were treated as different states along a successional sere.
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pone-0079125-g004: Cumulative survival percentages (mean ± SE) per m2 of the number of species (a) at different recipient sites and (b) from different soil sources, and of the number of seedlings (c) at different recipient sites and (d) from different soil sources at different months of the second year after soil (10 cm depth of 1 m ×1m sample) at earlier successional stages were replaced by soil of the later successional stage.Grass, shrub, secondary forest and primary forest were treated as different states along a successional sere.

Mentions: Survival percentage of seedlings and of species decreased 50% by the end of 2009 (12 months after soil transfers), and this decrease continued through 2010 (Figure 4). Seedlings and species from the young forest soil source had higher survival that those from primary forest soil source for most recording times. Survival percentage was higher at the shrub than at the young forest recipient site. During the dry season of 2010 (12-16 months after soil transfers), the survival percentage decreased quickly (Figure 4).


Successional distance between the source and recipient influence seed germination and seedling survival during surface soil replacement in SW China.

Shen YX, Gao L, Xia X, Li Y, Guan H - PLoS ONE (2013)

Cumulative survival percentages (mean ± SE) per m2 of the number of species (a) at different recipient sites and (b) from different soil sources, and of the number of seedlings (c) at different recipient sites and (d) from different soil sources at different months of the second year after soil (10 cm depth of 1 m ×1m sample) at earlier successional stages were replaced by soil of the later successional stage.Grass, shrub, secondary forest and primary forest were treated as different states along a successional sere.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815137&req=5

pone-0079125-g004: Cumulative survival percentages (mean ± SE) per m2 of the number of species (a) at different recipient sites and (b) from different soil sources, and of the number of seedlings (c) at different recipient sites and (d) from different soil sources at different months of the second year after soil (10 cm depth of 1 m ×1m sample) at earlier successional stages were replaced by soil of the later successional stage.Grass, shrub, secondary forest and primary forest were treated as different states along a successional sere.
Mentions: Survival percentage of seedlings and of species decreased 50% by the end of 2009 (12 months after soil transfers), and this decrease continued through 2010 (Figure 4). Seedlings and species from the young forest soil source had higher survival that those from primary forest soil source for most recording times. Survival percentage was higher at the shrub than at the young forest recipient site. During the dry season of 2010 (12-16 months after soil transfers), the survival percentage decreased quickly (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: However, heretofore no study has considered the effect of "successional distance" between source and recipient site.Ten 1 m ×1m soil quadrats in the grass, shrub and young forest sites were replaced with 10 cm deep soil sources from corresponding later successional stage(s) in January 2009.Our results, although based on an unreplicated chronosequence, suggest that successional distance between soil sources and recipient sites affect forest recruitment and restoration in degraded karst of SW China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Yunnan, P.R. China ; Restoration Ecology Group, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Adding propagules (source) to a degraded site (recipient) is a common way of manipulating secondary succession to restore diversity and services formerly provided by forests. However, heretofore no study has considered the effect of "successional distance" between source and recipient site. Four sites in the Shilin karst area of SW China were treated as different states along a secondary successional sere: grass, shrub, young secondary forest, and primary forest. Ten 1 m ×1m soil quadrats in the grass, shrub and young forest sites were replaced with 10 cm deep soil sources from corresponding later successional stage(s) in January 2009. Woody plant seed germination was monitored in the first year and seedling survival was monitored until the end of the second year. At the end of 2010, 2097 seeds of woody plants belonging to 45 taxa had germinated, and 3.9% of the seedlings and 7.8% of the species survived. Germination of most species was sensitive to ambient light (red, far-red, R:FR ratios, photosynthetically active radiation). Soil source and recipient site had a significant effect on the total number of seeds and number of species that germinated, and on the percentage of seedlings that survived through the end of the second year. Closer successional stages between recipient site and soil source had higher seed germination and seedling-survival percentages. However, a transition threshold exists in the young forest state, where seeds can germinate but not survive the second year. Our results, although based on an unreplicated chronosequence, suggest that successional distance between soil sources and recipient sites affect forest recruitment and restoration in degraded karst of SW China.

Show MeSH