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Long-term phenological shifts in raptor migration and climate.

Jaffré M, Beaugrand G, Goberville E, Jiguet F, Kjellén N, Troost G, Dubois PJ, Leprêtre A, Luczak C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Climate change is having a discernible effect on many biological and ecological processes.We found that when the temperatures increased, birds delayed their mean passage date of autumn migration.Such delay, in addition to an earlier spring migration, suggests that a significant warming may induce an extension of the breeding-area residence time of migratory raptors, which may eventually lead to residency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire d'Océanologie et de Géosciences UMR LOG CNRS 8187, Université Lille 1, Station Marine de Wimereux, Wimereux, France.

ABSTRACT
Climate change is having a discernible effect on many biological and ecological processes. Among observed changes, modifications in bird phenology have been widely documented. However, most studies have interpreted phenological shifts as gradual biological adjustments in response to the alteration of the thermal regime. Here we analysed a long-term dataset (1980-2010) of short-distance migratory raptors in five European regions. We revealed that the responses of these birds to climate-induced changes in autumn temperatures are abrupt and synchronous at a continental scale. We found that when the temperatures increased, birds delayed their mean passage date of autumn migration. Such delay, in addition to an earlier spring migration, suggests that a significant warming may induce an extension of the breeding-area residence time of migratory raptors, which may eventually lead to residency.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of the five sub-regions used in the study:A, Sweden. B, Netherlands. C, French Alps. D, Massif Central. E, Pyrenees.Illustrations of the seven species of raptor from left to right: red kite, marsh Harrier, hen harrier, merlin, sparrowhawk, common buzzard, and kestrel.
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pone-0079112-g002: Location of the five sub-regions used in the study:A, Sweden. B, Netherlands. C, French Alps. D, Massif Central. E, Pyrenees.Illustrations of the seven species of raptor from left to right: red kite, marsh Harrier, hen harrier, merlin, sparrowhawk, common buzzard, and kestrel.

Mentions: To investigate long-term (1980-2010) changes in raptor migrations in Western Europe, we used data collected on a daily basis at thirteen watchsites located along the most important western european migration flyways. To reduce the number of missing data and optimise seasonal coverage [15], the thirteen watchsites were rearranged into five sub-regions (Figure 2). The bird abundances for each monitoring day and for each sub-region were calculated using the mean of the abundances of the corresponding day in the corresponding sites (Table 1).


Long-term phenological shifts in raptor migration and climate.

Jaffré M, Beaugrand G, Goberville E, Jiguet F, Kjellén N, Troost G, Dubois PJ, Leprêtre A, Luczak C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Location of the five sub-regions used in the study:A, Sweden. B, Netherlands. C, French Alps. D, Massif Central. E, Pyrenees.Illustrations of the seven species of raptor from left to right: red kite, marsh Harrier, hen harrier, merlin, sparrowhawk, common buzzard, and kestrel.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815123&req=5

pone-0079112-g002: Location of the five sub-regions used in the study:A, Sweden. B, Netherlands. C, French Alps. D, Massif Central. E, Pyrenees.Illustrations of the seven species of raptor from left to right: red kite, marsh Harrier, hen harrier, merlin, sparrowhawk, common buzzard, and kestrel.
Mentions: To investigate long-term (1980-2010) changes in raptor migrations in Western Europe, we used data collected on a daily basis at thirteen watchsites located along the most important western european migration flyways. To reduce the number of missing data and optimise seasonal coverage [15], the thirteen watchsites were rearranged into five sub-regions (Figure 2). The bird abundances for each monitoring day and for each sub-region were calculated using the mean of the abundances of the corresponding day in the corresponding sites (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Climate change is having a discernible effect on many biological and ecological processes.We found that when the temperatures increased, birds delayed their mean passage date of autumn migration.Such delay, in addition to an earlier spring migration, suggests that a significant warming may induce an extension of the breeding-area residence time of migratory raptors, which may eventually lead to residency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire d'Océanologie et de Géosciences UMR LOG CNRS 8187, Université Lille 1, Station Marine de Wimereux, Wimereux, France.

ABSTRACT
Climate change is having a discernible effect on many biological and ecological processes. Among observed changes, modifications in bird phenology have been widely documented. However, most studies have interpreted phenological shifts as gradual biological adjustments in response to the alteration of the thermal regime. Here we analysed a long-term dataset (1980-2010) of short-distance migratory raptors in five European regions. We revealed that the responses of these birds to climate-induced changes in autumn temperatures are abrupt and synchronous at a continental scale. We found that when the temperatures increased, birds delayed their mean passage date of autumn migration. Such delay, in addition to an earlier spring migration, suggests that a significant warming may induce an extension of the breeding-area residence time of migratory raptors, which may eventually lead to residency.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus