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Giant cell angiofibroma of the scalp: A benign rare neoplasm with bone destruction.

Arifin MZ, Tjahjono FP, Faried A, Gill AS, Cahyadi A, Hernowo BS - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

Bottom Line: The incidence of extraorbital giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is rare, with only one case located in the scalp reported in the literature.We report a case of a 30-year-old female with a primary complaint of a painless solitary nodule arising on the left parietal region of the scalp.Our case is unique in that it is presented as a GCA of the scalp, which is an extremely rare clinical entity, and also demonstrated bone destruction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Universitas Padjadjaran-Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia ; Oncology Working Group, Health Research Unit, Universitas Padjadjaran-Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence of extraorbital giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is rare, with only one case located in the scalp reported in the literature. The morphological hallmark is histopathological examination showing richly vascularized pattern-less spindle cell proliferation containing pseudovascular spaces and floret-like multinucleate giant cells.

Case description: We report a case of a 30-year-old female with a primary complaint of a painless solitary nodule arising on the left parietal region of the scalp. Complete tumor removal through surgical intervention was achieved, and the postoperative period was uneventful.

Conclusion: Diagnosing a highly vascularized tumor in the head and neck is challenging. Our case is unique in that it is presented as a GCA of the scalp, which is an extremely rare clinical entity, and also demonstrated bone destruction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical picture of the patient that had a bony swelling over the left parietal region (a). A CT scan at regio left parietal reveal bone discontinuity that showed bony destruction (b). On macroscopic examination, reddish mass, size 6 × 5 cm and the temporal muscle, size 2 × 1 cm that had been infiltrated with GCA, were removed (c)
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Figure 1: Clinical picture of the patient that had a bony swelling over the left parietal region (a). A CT scan at regio left parietal reveal bone discontinuity that showed bony destruction (b). On macroscopic examination, reddish mass, size 6 × 5 cm and the temporal muscle, size 2 × 1 cm that had been infiltrated with GCA, were removed (c)

Mentions: A 30-year-old female presented with a bony swelling over her left parietal region that had increased in size over the past 2 years. She had no history of trauma, bone pain, systemic disease, or neurological symptoms. Physical examination found a swelling that was 6 × 5 cm in size, soft, and without any tenderness [Figure 1a]. The skin over the swelling area was loosely attached to the underlying soft tissue. There was no venous dilatation, scars, sinuses, or any bruit heard over the swelling. Neurological examination was unremarkable and fundoscopy examination revealed no papilledema.


Giant cell angiofibroma of the scalp: A benign rare neoplasm with bone destruction.

Arifin MZ, Tjahjono FP, Faried A, Gill AS, Cahyadi A, Hernowo BS - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

Clinical picture of the patient that had a bony swelling over the left parietal region (a). A CT scan at regio left parietal reveal bone discontinuity that showed bony destruction (b). On macroscopic examination, reddish mass, size 6 × 5 cm and the temporal muscle, size 2 × 1 cm that had been infiltrated with GCA, were removed (c)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815085&req=5

Figure 1: Clinical picture of the patient that had a bony swelling over the left parietal region (a). A CT scan at regio left parietal reveal bone discontinuity that showed bony destruction (b). On macroscopic examination, reddish mass, size 6 × 5 cm and the temporal muscle, size 2 × 1 cm that had been infiltrated with GCA, were removed (c)
Mentions: A 30-year-old female presented with a bony swelling over her left parietal region that had increased in size over the past 2 years. She had no history of trauma, bone pain, systemic disease, or neurological symptoms. Physical examination found a swelling that was 6 × 5 cm in size, soft, and without any tenderness [Figure 1a]. The skin over the swelling area was loosely attached to the underlying soft tissue. There was no venous dilatation, scars, sinuses, or any bruit heard over the swelling. Neurological examination was unremarkable and fundoscopy examination revealed no papilledema.

Bottom Line: The incidence of extraorbital giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is rare, with only one case located in the scalp reported in the literature.We report a case of a 30-year-old female with a primary complaint of a painless solitary nodule arising on the left parietal region of the scalp.Our case is unique in that it is presented as a GCA of the scalp, which is an extremely rare clinical entity, and also demonstrated bone destruction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Universitas Padjadjaran-Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia ; Oncology Working Group, Health Research Unit, Universitas Padjadjaran-Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence of extraorbital giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is rare, with only one case located in the scalp reported in the literature. The morphological hallmark is histopathological examination showing richly vascularized pattern-less spindle cell proliferation containing pseudovascular spaces and floret-like multinucleate giant cells.

Case description: We report a case of a 30-year-old female with a primary complaint of a painless solitary nodule arising on the left parietal region of the scalp. Complete tumor removal through surgical intervention was achieved, and the postoperative period was uneventful.

Conclusion: Diagnosing a highly vascularized tumor in the head and neck is challenging. Our case is unique in that it is presented as a GCA of the scalp, which is an extremely rare clinical entity, and also demonstrated bone destruction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus