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Sperm nuclear architecture is locally modified in presence of a Robertsonian translocation t(13;17).

Acloque H, Bonnet-Garnier A, Mompart F, Pinton A, Yerle-Bouissou M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity.Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization.Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR444 Génétique Cellulaire, Castanet Tolosan, France ; Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, UMR444 Génétique Cellulaire, Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT
In mammals, the non-random organization of the sperm nucleus supports an early function during embryonic development. Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity. Thus, rare studies on sperm cells from infertile patients described an altered nuclear organization that may be a cause or a consequence of their respective pathologies. Thereby, chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy can be studied not only for their adverse effects on production of normal/balanced gametes at meiosis but also for their possible impact on sperm nuclear architecture and the epigenetic consequences of altered chromosome positioning. We decided to compare the global architecture of sperm nuclei from boars, either with a normal chromosome composition or with a Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 13 and 17. We hypothesized that the fusion between these chromosomes may change their spatial organization and we examined to what extend it could also modify the global sperm nuclear architecture. Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization. But specific analysis of chromosomes 13 and 17 territories highlights an influence of chromosome 17 for the positioning of the fused chromosomes within the nucleus. We also observed a specific clustering of centromeres depending of the chromosome subtypes. Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning.

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Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not affect SSCX and SSCY localization in the sperm nucleus.A–B. Comparison of SSCX distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test. C–D. Comparison of SSCY distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test.
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pone-0078005-g004: Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not affect SSCX and SSCY localization in the sperm nucleus.A–B. Comparison of SSCX distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test. C–D. Comparison of SSCY distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test.

Mentions: We then compared the localization of SSCX and SSCY in control and t(13;17) sperm cells (Fig. 4). As for the control, SSCY was located more apically and more internally than SSCX in t(13;17) sperm cells. Regarding each specific chromosome, we observed that SSCX territory is located more apically in t(13;17) sperm cells than in the control animal (54.45% vs 52.98% along the antero-posterior axis respectively) but this difference is not significant (p-value 0.38, Fig. 4A). Regarding the medio-lateral positioning, SSCX and SSCY from t(13;17) sperm cells were located more internally (29.37% vs 36.67% and 21.89% vs 26.7% respectively, along the medio-lateral axis) but again the difference was not significant (Fig. 4B and Fig. 4D). In addition to the observations made on centromeres and telomeres clusters, our results suggest that the Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not significantly affect the global architecture of the sperm nucleus.


Sperm nuclear architecture is locally modified in presence of a Robertsonian translocation t(13;17).

Acloque H, Bonnet-Garnier A, Mompart F, Pinton A, Yerle-Bouissou M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not affect SSCX and SSCY localization in the sperm nucleus.A–B. Comparison of SSCX distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test. C–D. Comparison of SSCY distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815027&req=5

pone-0078005-g004: Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not affect SSCX and SSCY localization in the sperm nucleus.A–B. Comparison of SSCX distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test. C–D. Comparison of SSCY distribution along the antero-posterior (A) and medio-lateral (B) axis in sperm nuclei from control (gold yellow) and t(13;17)(dark green) animals. Mean values for each condition are represented above the violinplot with the p-value of the corresponding t-test.
Mentions: We then compared the localization of SSCX and SSCY in control and t(13;17) sperm cells (Fig. 4). As for the control, SSCY was located more apically and more internally than SSCX in t(13;17) sperm cells. Regarding each specific chromosome, we observed that SSCX territory is located more apically in t(13;17) sperm cells than in the control animal (54.45% vs 52.98% along the antero-posterior axis respectively) but this difference is not significant (p-value 0.38, Fig. 4A). Regarding the medio-lateral positioning, SSCX and SSCY from t(13;17) sperm cells were located more internally (29.37% vs 36.67% and 21.89% vs 26.7% respectively, along the medio-lateral axis) but again the difference was not significant (Fig. 4B and Fig. 4D). In addition to the observations made on centromeres and telomeres clusters, our results suggest that the Robertsonian translocation t(13;17) does not significantly affect the global architecture of the sperm nucleus.

Bottom Line: Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity.Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization.Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR444 Génétique Cellulaire, Castanet Tolosan, France ; Université de Toulouse, INP, ENVT, UMR444 Génétique Cellulaire, Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT
In mammals, the non-random organization of the sperm nucleus supports an early function during embryonic development. Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity. Thus, rare studies on sperm cells from infertile patients described an altered nuclear organization that may be a cause or a consequence of their respective pathologies. Thereby, chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy can be studied not only for their adverse effects on production of normal/balanced gametes at meiosis but also for their possible impact on sperm nuclear architecture and the epigenetic consequences of altered chromosome positioning. We decided to compare the global architecture of sperm nuclei from boars, either with a normal chromosome composition or with a Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 13 and 17. We hypothesized that the fusion between these chromosomes may change their spatial organization and we examined to what extend it could also modify the global sperm nuclear architecture. Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization. But specific analysis of chromosomes 13 and 17 territories highlights an influence of chromosome 17 for the positioning of the fused chromosomes within the nucleus. We also observed a specific clustering of centromeres depending of the chromosome subtypes. Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus