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The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra.

Dabdoub CF, Dabdoub CB - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages.Nowadays, our national society has 74 members.It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Japanese University Hospital, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

ABSTRACT
The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country.

No MeSH data available.


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(a) Felix Veintemillas, (b) Mario Michel Zamora, and (c) Oscar Quiroga Abasto
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Figure 6: (a) Felix Veintemillas, (b) Mario Michel Zamora, and (c) Oscar Quiroga Abasto

Mentions: Before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. One of them was Felix Veintemillas Butrón (1889-1951) [Figure 6a]. He graduated from the University of San Andrés in 1913.[14] He was a professor of otolaryngology and bacteriology and carried out several neurosurgical procedures after 1920,[11] which he learned during his training in France, Switzerland, and Germany from 1914 to 1919.[1] He did numerous craniotomies for head trauma and brain tumors, demonstrating outstanding skills for their time.[17] For this reason, Veintemillas is recognized as the pioneer of neurosurgery in Bolivia.[1] Later on, during the war between Bolivia and Paraguay (1932-1935), Abelardo Ibáñez Benavente (1896-1977), a general surgeon and orthopedist trained in Chile, had the opportunity to perform peripheral nerve surgery on an individual wounded in this conflict. He wrote A New Suturing Technique and Vascular Grafts and, in 1936, with Vicente Gómez Carretero, a traumatologist, Reconstructive Surgery of the Peripheral Nerve Lesions.[17] Ibáñez was the founder of the Bolivian Surgical Society.[9]


The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra.

Dabdoub CF, Dabdoub CB - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

(a) Felix Veintemillas, (b) Mario Michel Zamora, and (c) Oscar Quiroga Abasto
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815021&req=5

Figure 6: (a) Felix Veintemillas, (b) Mario Michel Zamora, and (c) Oscar Quiroga Abasto
Mentions: Before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. One of them was Felix Veintemillas Butrón (1889-1951) [Figure 6a]. He graduated from the University of San Andrés in 1913.[14] He was a professor of otolaryngology and bacteriology and carried out several neurosurgical procedures after 1920,[11] which he learned during his training in France, Switzerland, and Germany from 1914 to 1919.[1] He did numerous craniotomies for head trauma and brain tumors, demonstrating outstanding skills for their time.[17] For this reason, Veintemillas is recognized as the pioneer of neurosurgery in Bolivia.[1] Later on, during the war between Bolivia and Paraguay (1932-1935), Abelardo Ibáñez Benavente (1896-1977), a general surgeon and orthopedist trained in Chile, had the opportunity to perform peripheral nerve surgery on an individual wounded in this conflict. He wrote A New Suturing Technique and Vascular Grafts and, in 1936, with Vicente Gómez Carretero, a traumatologist, Reconstructive Surgery of the Peripheral Nerve Lesions.[17] Ibáñez was the founder of the Bolivian Surgical Society.[9]

Bottom Line: Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages.Nowadays, our national society has 74 members.It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Japanese University Hospital, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

ABSTRACT
The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus