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The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra.

Dabdoub CF, Dabdoub CB - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages.Nowadays, our national society has 74 members.It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Japanese University Hospital, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

ABSTRACT
The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Handheld tumi (AD 800-1100), (b and c) trephinations with bone regeneration, and (d) suture needles and hemostatic clamps (photo courtesy of Dr. R. Alvarado-Reyes)
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Figure 3: (a) Handheld tumi (AD 800-1100), (b and c) trephinations with bone regeneration, and (d) suture needles and hemostatic clamps (photo courtesy of Dr. R. Alvarado-Reyes)

Mentions: To perform skull trepanations, instruments called tumis–the symbol of the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies,[6] a ceremonial knife characterized by a semicircular blade, made of gold, silver, and bronze alloy, usually made of one piece–were used [Figure 3a]. It has been suggested that coca, which has local anesthetic properties and native to the Andes, could have been used to allay the pain of cutting through the scalp. It is probable that this procedure was performed for medical reasons, such as depressed fractures, because some were clearly surgeries after trauma. But other skulls showed no sign of previous injury, perhaps because the natives believed that bad spirits could cause discomfort, such as epilepsy and pain, and needed to be let out of the skull by trephining [Figure 3b and c]. Later, some devices were also found, such as suture needles, hemostatic forceps [Figure 3d], or brain spatulas, alike to those used by Olivecrona, or similar instruments to the dura mater elevator of Sauerbruch.[15] Anthropologists have discovered evidence, which suggests that survival rates may have been as high as 60%.[2]


The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra.

Dabdoub CF, Dabdoub CB - Surg Neurol Int (2013)

(a) Handheld tumi (AD 800-1100), (b and c) trephinations with bone regeneration, and (d) suture needles and hemostatic clamps (photo courtesy of Dr. R. Alvarado-Reyes)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815021&req=5

Figure 3: (a) Handheld tumi (AD 800-1100), (b and c) trephinations with bone regeneration, and (d) suture needles and hemostatic clamps (photo courtesy of Dr. R. Alvarado-Reyes)
Mentions: To perform skull trepanations, instruments called tumis–the symbol of the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies,[6] a ceremonial knife characterized by a semicircular blade, made of gold, silver, and bronze alloy, usually made of one piece–were used [Figure 3a]. It has been suggested that coca, which has local anesthetic properties and native to the Andes, could have been used to allay the pain of cutting through the scalp. It is probable that this procedure was performed for medical reasons, such as depressed fractures, because some were clearly surgeries after trauma. But other skulls showed no sign of previous injury, perhaps because the natives believed that bad spirits could cause discomfort, such as epilepsy and pain, and needed to be let out of the skull by trephining [Figure 3b and c]. Later, some devices were also found, such as suture needles, hemostatic forceps [Figure 3d], or brain spatulas, alike to those used by Olivecrona, or similar instruments to the dura mater elevator of Sauerbruch.[15] Anthropologists have discovered evidence, which suggests that survival rates may have been as high as 60%.[2]

Bottom Line: Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages.Nowadays, our national society has 74 members.It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Japanese University Hospital, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

ABSTRACT
The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus