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Cortical inhibition deficits in recent onset PTSD after a single prolonged trauma exposure.

Qi S, Mu Y, Liu K, Zhang J, Huan Y, Tan Q, Shi M, Wang Q, Chen Y, Wang H, Wang H, Zhang N, Zhang X, Xiong L, Yin H - Neuroimage Clin (2013)

Bottom Line: The widespread cortical thickness reduction relative to the normal controls were found in bilateral inferior and superior parietal lobes, frontal lobes, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, and right lateral occipital lobes in trauma survivors, whereas cortical thickness was only increased in left calcarine cortex in PTSD group.We further demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of bilateral ACC and PCC, superior frontal lobes, and hippocampus are negatively correlated with CAPS scores in all trauma survivors.Our study results suggest that stress widens cortical thinning regions and causes more serious effect in recent onset PTSD than non PTSD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032, China.

ABSTRACT
A variety of structural abnormalities have been described in post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but only a few studies have focused on cortical thickness alterations in recent onset PTSD. In this study, we adopted surface-based morphometry (SBM), which enables an exploration of global structural changes throughout the brain, in order to compare cortical thickness alterations in recent onset PTSD patients, trauma-exposed subjects but without PTSD, and normal controls. Moreover, we used region of interest (ROI) partial correlation analysis to evaluate the correlation among PTSD symptom severity and significant changes of cortical thickness. The widespread cortical thickness reduction relative to the normal controls were found in bilateral inferior and superior parietal lobes, frontal lobes, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, and right lateral occipital lobes in trauma survivors, whereas cortical thickness was only increased in left calcarine cortex in PTSD group. The average cortical thickness of hippocampus and cingulate cortex decreased by 10.75% and 9.09% in PTSD, 3.48% and 2.86% in non PTSD. We further demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of bilateral ACC and PCC, superior frontal lobes, and hippocampus are negatively correlated with CAPS scores in all trauma survivors. Our study results suggest that stress widens cortical thinning regions and causes more serious effect in recent onset PTSD than non PTSD. It also shows that the cortical thinning in recent onset PTSD predicts the symptom severity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The cortical thickness difference between PTSD group and non-PTSD group.Region abbreviations from FreeSurfer model: SFG, superior frontal gyrus; HiG, hippocampal gyrus; IPL, inferior parietal lobes; ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; RMFG, rostral middle frontal gyrus; LOG, lateral occipital gyrus. The T value color was overlaid on the reconstruction image, and the color bar was shown at the bottom. The age and gender effects were removed by regression.
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f0010: The cortical thickness difference between PTSD group and non-PTSD group.Region abbreviations from FreeSurfer model: SFG, superior frontal gyrus; HiG, hippocampal gyrus; IPL, inferior parietal lobes; ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; RMFG, rostral middle frontal gyrus; LOG, lateral occipital gyrus. The T value color was overlaid on the reconstruction image, and the color bar was shown at the bottom. The age and gender effects were removed by regression.

Mentions: There was cortical thickening only in the left calcarine cortex (Fig. 2).


Cortical inhibition deficits in recent onset PTSD after a single prolonged trauma exposure.

Qi S, Mu Y, Liu K, Zhang J, Huan Y, Tan Q, Shi M, Wang Q, Chen Y, Wang H, Wang H, Zhang N, Zhang X, Xiong L, Yin H - Neuroimage Clin (2013)

The cortical thickness difference between PTSD group and non-PTSD group.Region abbreviations from FreeSurfer model: SFG, superior frontal gyrus; HiG, hippocampal gyrus; IPL, inferior parietal lobes; ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; RMFG, rostral middle frontal gyrus; LOG, lateral occipital gyrus. The T value color was overlaid on the reconstruction image, and the color bar was shown at the bottom. The age and gender effects were removed by regression.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815016&req=5

f0010: The cortical thickness difference between PTSD group and non-PTSD group.Region abbreviations from FreeSurfer model: SFG, superior frontal gyrus; HiG, hippocampal gyrus; IPL, inferior parietal lobes; ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; RMFG, rostral middle frontal gyrus; LOG, lateral occipital gyrus. The T value color was overlaid on the reconstruction image, and the color bar was shown at the bottom. The age and gender effects were removed by regression.
Mentions: There was cortical thickening only in the left calcarine cortex (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The widespread cortical thickness reduction relative to the normal controls were found in bilateral inferior and superior parietal lobes, frontal lobes, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, and right lateral occipital lobes in trauma survivors, whereas cortical thickness was only increased in left calcarine cortex in PTSD group.We further demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of bilateral ACC and PCC, superior frontal lobes, and hippocampus are negatively correlated with CAPS scores in all trauma survivors.Our study results suggest that stress widens cortical thinning regions and causes more serious effect in recent onset PTSD than non PTSD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710032, China.

ABSTRACT
A variety of structural abnormalities have been described in post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but only a few studies have focused on cortical thickness alterations in recent onset PTSD. In this study, we adopted surface-based morphometry (SBM), which enables an exploration of global structural changes throughout the brain, in order to compare cortical thickness alterations in recent onset PTSD patients, trauma-exposed subjects but without PTSD, and normal controls. Moreover, we used region of interest (ROI) partial correlation analysis to evaluate the correlation among PTSD symptom severity and significant changes of cortical thickness. The widespread cortical thickness reduction relative to the normal controls were found in bilateral inferior and superior parietal lobes, frontal lobes, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, and right lateral occipital lobes in trauma survivors, whereas cortical thickness was only increased in left calcarine cortex in PTSD group. The average cortical thickness of hippocampus and cingulate cortex decreased by 10.75% and 9.09% in PTSD, 3.48% and 2.86% in non PTSD. We further demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of bilateral ACC and PCC, superior frontal lobes, and hippocampus are negatively correlated with CAPS scores in all trauma survivors. Our study results suggest that stress widens cortical thinning regions and causes more serious effect in recent onset PTSD than non PTSD. It also shows that the cortical thinning in recent onset PTSD predicts the symptom severity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus