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The benefits of skull stripping in the normalization of clinical fMRI data.

Fischmeister FP, Höllinger I, Klinger N, Geissler A, Wurnig MC, Matt E, Rath J, Robinson SD, Trattnig S, Beisteiner R - Neuroimage Clin (2013)

Bottom Line: The optimum procedure has not been conclusively established, and a critical dichotomy is whether to use input data sets which contain skull signal, or whether skull signal should be removed.Brain activation changes related to deskulled/not-deskulled input data are determined in the context of very recently developed (New Segment, Unified Segmentation) and standard normalization approaches.Analysis of structural and functional data demonstrates that skull stripping improves language localization in MNI space - particularly when used in combination with the New Segment normalization technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Study Group Clinical fMRI, Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria ; High Field MR Center, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Establishing a reliable correspondence between lesioned brains and a template is challenging using current normalization techniques. The optimum procedure has not been conclusively established, and a critical dichotomy is whether to use input data sets which contain skull signal, or whether skull signal should be removed. Here we provide a first investigation into whether clinical fMRI benefits from skull stripping, based on data from a presurgical language localization task. Brain activation changes related to deskulled/not-deskulled input data are determined in the context of very recently developed (New Segment, Unified Segmentation) and standard normalization approaches. Analysis of structural and functional data demonstrates that skull stripping improves language localization in MNI space - particularly when used in combination with the New Segment normalization technique.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain position and MNI coordinates of peak voxel location for a representative patient (case 6) resulting from the 6 normalization pipelines. Note that the Wernicke peak-voxel is located in the same neuroanatomical region, yet this region is shifted in the MNI space.
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f0040: Brain position and MNI coordinates of peak voxel location for a representative patient (case 6) resulting from the 6 normalization pipelines. Note that the Wernicke peak-voxel is located in the same neuroanatomical region, yet this region is shifted in the MNI space.

Mentions: Statistical parametric maps were thresholded using a voxel-wise p < 0.001. Since our primary interest was in clinically relevant effects, all data were masked exclusively for an extended temporoparietal ROI (including Wernicke's area) and an extended inferior frontal ROI (including Broca's area) using automated anatomical labeling (AAL; Tzourio-Mazoyer et al., 2002) and the Wake Forest University PickAtlas (WFU; Maldjian et al., 2003). In addition, an individual neuroanatomical assessment of functional localization was performed. Statistical t-maps were overlaid onto the warped individual anatomical image and onto the MNI152 template for visual inspection of functional activation after normalization. The relative position of primary functional clusters (Wernicke and Broca) and ROI peak activation (peak t-value) in relation to individual neuroanatomy was evaluated by two of the authors (RB, FF, see Fig. 8). For this, the patients' independent (non-normalized) clinical fMRI results, which are used in pre-surgical planning (Beisteiner et al., 2000) and which have been verified via intraoperative cortical stimulation (see Roessler et al. (2005b)), served as a gold standard.


The benefits of skull stripping in the normalization of clinical fMRI data.

Fischmeister FP, Höllinger I, Klinger N, Geissler A, Wurnig MC, Matt E, Rath J, Robinson SD, Trattnig S, Beisteiner R - Neuroimage Clin (2013)

Brain position and MNI coordinates of peak voxel location for a representative patient (case 6) resulting from the 6 normalization pipelines. Note that the Wernicke peak-voxel is located in the same neuroanatomical region, yet this region is shifted in the MNI space.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814956&req=5

f0040: Brain position and MNI coordinates of peak voxel location for a representative patient (case 6) resulting from the 6 normalization pipelines. Note that the Wernicke peak-voxel is located in the same neuroanatomical region, yet this region is shifted in the MNI space.
Mentions: Statistical parametric maps were thresholded using a voxel-wise p < 0.001. Since our primary interest was in clinically relevant effects, all data were masked exclusively for an extended temporoparietal ROI (including Wernicke's area) and an extended inferior frontal ROI (including Broca's area) using automated anatomical labeling (AAL; Tzourio-Mazoyer et al., 2002) and the Wake Forest University PickAtlas (WFU; Maldjian et al., 2003). In addition, an individual neuroanatomical assessment of functional localization was performed. Statistical t-maps were overlaid onto the warped individual anatomical image and onto the MNI152 template for visual inspection of functional activation after normalization. The relative position of primary functional clusters (Wernicke and Broca) and ROI peak activation (peak t-value) in relation to individual neuroanatomy was evaluated by two of the authors (RB, FF, see Fig. 8). For this, the patients' independent (non-normalized) clinical fMRI results, which are used in pre-surgical planning (Beisteiner et al., 2000) and which have been verified via intraoperative cortical stimulation (see Roessler et al. (2005b)), served as a gold standard.

Bottom Line: The optimum procedure has not been conclusively established, and a critical dichotomy is whether to use input data sets which contain skull signal, or whether skull signal should be removed.Brain activation changes related to deskulled/not-deskulled input data are determined in the context of very recently developed (New Segment, Unified Segmentation) and standard normalization approaches.Analysis of structural and functional data demonstrates that skull stripping improves language localization in MNI space - particularly when used in combination with the New Segment normalization technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Study Group Clinical fMRI, Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria ; High Field MR Center, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Establishing a reliable correspondence between lesioned brains and a template is challenging using current normalization techniques. The optimum procedure has not been conclusively established, and a critical dichotomy is whether to use input data sets which contain skull signal, or whether skull signal should be removed. Here we provide a first investigation into whether clinical fMRI benefits from skull stripping, based on data from a presurgical language localization task. Brain activation changes related to deskulled/not-deskulled input data are determined in the context of very recently developed (New Segment, Unified Segmentation) and standard normalization approaches. Analysis of structural and functional data demonstrates that skull stripping improves language localization in MNI space - particularly when used in combination with the New Segment normalization technique.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus