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Effect of storage levels of nitric oxide derivatives in blood components.

Qazi MA, Rizzatti F, Piknova B, Sibmooh N, Stroncek DF, Schechter AN - F1000Res (2012)

Bottom Line: Cells from bags maintained in an argon chamber showed decreased nitrite levels compared to those maintained in room air.Inhibition of enzymes implicated in the NO cycle did not alter nitrite levels.These measurements may explain some adverse effects of RBC transfusion and suggest ways of optimizing the preservation of stored blood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Medicine Branch, National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Potential deleterious effects of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, especially from blood kept at length, have been ascribed to biochemical changes during storage, including those of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. Study methods and design: In this study, NO metabolites, nitrite and nitrate, were quantified in RBCs and whole blood with time of storage. Whole blood (WB), leukoreduced (LR), and non-leukoreduced (NLR) components were obtained from healthy volunteer donors and stored in polyvinyl chloride bags for 42 days. Nitrite and nitrate were measured using reductive gas-phase chemiluminescence.

Results: Nitrite concentrations initially decreased rapidly from about 150nmol/L, but stabilized at about 44nmol/L in room air for up to 42 days. Nitrate concentrations remained stable during storage at about 35µmol/L. Cells from bags maintained in an argon chamber showed decreased nitrite levels compared to those maintained in room air. Inhibition of enzymes implicated in the NO cycle did not alter nitrite levels.

Conclusion: As erythrocytes may contribute to the control of blood flow and oxygen delivery through reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions, the present findings provide insight into possible effects of blood transfusion. These measurements may explain some adverse effects of RBC transfusion and suggest ways of optimizing the preservation of stored blood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nitrite concentration in supernatants and saline stored in room air or an argon chamber.Figure 3A shows the nitrite concentration in supernatants stored in room air, number of donors, n=3, whileFigure 3B shows the same for supernatants stored in an argon chamber, number of donors, n=3. Nitrite concentrations in saline controls stored under both conditions are shown inFigure 3C, number of donors, n=6 (room air n=3, argon chamber n=3).
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f3: Nitrite concentration in supernatants and saline stored in room air or an argon chamber.Figure 3A shows the nitrite concentration in supernatants stored in room air, number of donors, n=3, whileFigure 3B shows the same for supernatants stored in an argon chamber, number of donors, n=3. Nitrite concentrations in saline controls stored under both conditions are shown inFigure 3C, number of donors, n=6 (room air n=3, argon chamber n=3).

Mentions: Nitrite underwent additional, but slower decay in all three product forms and their supernatants over 42 days of storage, but the nitrite concentration leveled off in room air samples at about 44nM (Figure 2A) in all three blood components. This gradual decrease in concentration and leveling was found in both air and argon chamber stored blood (Figure 2B). However, comparison of blood nitrite levels from air(Figure 2A) and the argon chamber (Figure 2B) reveals a noticeable depression in nitrite values in the chamber environment that is consistent throughout the storage period. RBCs stored in room air had nitrite concentrations of 42 ± 4nM on day 42; while the argon chamber samples decreased in concentration to 16 ± 3nM on day 42. WB stored in room air reached nitrite concentrations of 44 ± 8nM, while WB stored in the chamber reached nitrite concentrations of 26 ± 3nM by the end of the storage period (p>0.05). Under both storage conditions, nitrite levels were very similar (within the error of this assay) for the three types of cell preparations–whole blood, non-leukoreduced RBCs, and leukoreduced RBCs-for the duration of the experiment (Supplemental Figure 2). However, the higher values in room air as compared to chamber-stored samples suggest additional factors affecting production and/or destruction of nitrite ions.Supplemental Figure 2 presents curve-fitting of these data, displaying room air and chamber nitrite decay for the individual blood components. The same trends were seen in the nitrite concentrations of supernatants for each of the three blood components (Figures 3A and 3B). Nitrite concentration in supernatants was significantly lower than that in blood components, confirming nitrite localization in erythrocytes and the findings of previous studies21.


Effect of storage levels of nitric oxide derivatives in blood components.

Qazi MA, Rizzatti F, Piknova B, Sibmooh N, Stroncek DF, Schechter AN - F1000Res (2012)

Nitrite concentration in supernatants and saline stored in room air or an argon chamber.Figure 3A shows the nitrite concentration in supernatants stored in room air, number of donors, n=3, whileFigure 3B shows the same for supernatants stored in an argon chamber, number of donors, n=3. Nitrite concentrations in saline controls stored under both conditions are shown inFigure 3C, number of donors, n=6 (room air n=3, argon chamber n=3).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814924&req=5

f3: Nitrite concentration in supernatants and saline stored in room air or an argon chamber.Figure 3A shows the nitrite concentration in supernatants stored in room air, number of donors, n=3, whileFigure 3B shows the same for supernatants stored in an argon chamber, number of donors, n=3. Nitrite concentrations in saline controls stored under both conditions are shown inFigure 3C, number of donors, n=6 (room air n=3, argon chamber n=3).
Mentions: Nitrite underwent additional, but slower decay in all three product forms and their supernatants over 42 days of storage, but the nitrite concentration leveled off in room air samples at about 44nM (Figure 2A) in all three blood components. This gradual decrease in concentration and leveling was found in both air and argon chamber stored blood (Figure 2B). However, comparison of blood nitrite levels from air(Figure 2A) and the argon chamber (Figure 2B) reveals a noticeable depression in nitrite values in the chamber environment that is consistent throughout the storage period. RBCs stored in room air had nitrite concentrations of 42 ± 4nM on day 42; while the argon chamber samples decreased in concentration to 16 ± 3nM on day 42. WB stored in room air reached nitrite concentrations of 44 ± 8nM, while WB stored in the chamber reached nitrite concentrations of 26 ± 3nM by the end of the storage period (p>0.05). Under both storage conditions, nitrite levels were very similar (within the error of this assay) for the three types of cell preparations–whole blood, non-leukoreduced RBCs, and leukoreduced RBCs-for the duration of the experiment (Supplemental Figure 2). However, the higher values in room air as compared to chamber-stored samples suggest additional factors affecting production and/or destruction of nitrite ions.Supplemental Figure 2 presents curve-fitting of these data, displaying room air and chamber nitrite decay for the individual blood components. The same trends were seen in the nitrite concentrations of supernatants for each of the three blood components (Figures 3A and 3B). Nitrite concentration in supernatants was significantly lower than that in blood components, confirming nitrite localization in erythrocytes and the findings of previous studies21.

Bottom Line: Cells from bags maintained in an argon chamber showed decreased nitrite levels compared to those maintained in room air.Inhibition of enzymes implicated in the NO cycle did not alter nitrite levels.These measurements may explain some adverse effects of RBC transfusion and suggest ways of optimizing the preservation of stored blood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Medicine Branch, National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Potential deleterious effects of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, especially from blood kept at length, have been ascribed to biochemical changes during storage, including those of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. Study methods and design: In this study, NO metabolites, nitrite and nitrate, were quantified in RBCs and whole blood with time of storage. Whole blood (WB), leukoreduced (LR), and non-leukoreduced (NLR) components were obtained from healthy volunteer donors and stored in polyvinyl chloride bags for 42 days. Nitrite and nitrate were measured using reductive gas-phase chemiluminescence.

Results: Nitrite concentrations initially decreased rapidly from about 150nmol/L, but stabilized at about 44nmol/L in room air for up to 42 days. Nitrate concentrations remained stable during storage at about 35µmol/L. Cells from bags maintained in an argon chamber showed decreased nitrite levels compared to those maintained in room air. Inhibition of enzymes implicated in the NO cycle did not alter nitrite levels.

Conclusion: As erythrocytes may contribute to the control of blood flow and oxygen delivery through reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions, the present findings provide insight into possible effects of blood transfusion. These measurements may explain some adverse effects of RBC transfusion and suggest ways of optimizing the preservation of stored blood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus