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A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours.

Abd-Elsayed AA, Díaz-Gómez J, Barnett GH, Kurz A, Inton-Santos M, Barsoum S, Avitsian R, Ebrahim Z, Jevtovic-Todorovic V, Farag E - F1000Res (2013)

Bottom Line: The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores.Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient.In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA ; Department of Outcomes Research, Anesthesia Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA.

ABSTRACT
Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS) and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC) at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old). Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Algorithm for management of brain tumours in pregnant women.
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f1: Algorithm for management of brain tumours in pregnant women.

Mentions: There are no guidelines for the management of intracranial tumours in pregnant women. A possible algorithm to follow is shown inFigure 1 (modified from Tewariet al.1).


A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours.

Abd-Elsayed AA, Díaz-Gómez J, Barnett GH, Kurz A, Inton-Santos M, Barsoum S, Avitsian R, Ebrahim Z, Jevtovic-Todorovic V, Farag E - F1000Res (2013)

Algorithm for management of brain tumours in pregnant women.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814915&req=5

f1: Algorithm for management of brain tumours in pregnant women.
Mentions: There are no guidelines for the management of intracranial tumours in pregnant women. A possible algorithm to follow is shown inFigure 1 (modified from Tewariet al.1).

Bottom Line: The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores.Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient.In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA ; Department of Outcomes Research, Anesthesia Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA.

ABSTRACT
Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS) and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC) at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old). Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus