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Visual causal models enhance clinical explanations of treatments for generalized anxiety disorder.

Kim NS, Khalife D, Judge KA, Paulus DJ, Jordan JT, Yopchick JE - J Health Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: Patients and lay people learned significantly more from visual causal model presentations than from auditory-only presentations, and visual causal models were perceived to be helpful.Participants retained some information 4 weeks after the presentation, although the advantage of visual causal models did not persist in the long term.In conclusion, dual-mode presentations featuring visual causal models yield significant relative gains in patient comprehension immediately after the clinical session, at a time when the authors suggest that patients may be most willing to begin the recommended treatment plan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Psychology , Northeastern University , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

ABSTRACT
A daily challenge in clinical practice is to adequately explain disorders and treatments to patients of varying levels of literacy in a time-limited situation. Drawing jointly upon research on causal reasoning and multimodal theory, the authors asked whether adding visual causal models to clinical explanations promotes patient learning. Participants were 86 people currently or formerly diagnosed with a mood disorder and 104 lay people in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, who were randomly assigned to receive either a visual causal model (dual-mode) presentation or auditory-only presentation of an explanation about generalized anxiety disorder and its treatment. Participants' knowledge was tested before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after the presentation. Patients and lay people learned significantly more from visual causal model presentations than from auditory-only presentations, and visual causal models were perceived to be helpful. Participants retained some information 4 weeks after the presentation, although the advantage of visual causal models did not persist in the long term. In conclusion, dual-mode presentations featuring visual causal models yield significant relative gains in patient comprehension immediately after the clinical session, at a time when the authors suggest that patients may be most willing to begin the recommended treatment plan.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample visual causal model illustrating Clinician I's verbal explanation of generalized anxiety disorder and the treatment that Clinician I most typically prescribes. The wording of each phrase was taken verbatim from the clinician's explanation to correspond to the clinician's audio recording in the dual-mode condition.
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Figure 1: Sample visual causal model illustrating Clinician I's verbal explanation of generalized anxiety disorder and the treatment that Clinician I most typically prescribes. The wording of each phrase was taken verbatim from the clinician's explanation to correspond to the clinician's audio recording in the dual-mode condition.

Mentions: Realistic auditory explanations of GAD were acquired by asking two experienced, board-certified psychiatrists what they would tell a patient just diagnosed with GAD about the disorder and the treatments they would typically prescribe. Clinicians were asked to mimic speaking to an actual patient and to confine their comments to what they would typically have time to say in an actual session. We audio-recorded these explanations, transcribed them, and then met again with each clinician. We asked them to identify from the transcript the most important points they would want their patients to take away from a real clinical session. On the basis of their feedback, we then created a visual causal model of each clinician's explanation using the Concept Builder software (Kim & Park, 2009; see Figure 1). Each clinician also generated eight questions to test participants' comprehension of the most important take-home information.


Visual causal models enhance clinical explanations of treatments for generalized anxiety disorder.

Kim NS, Khalife D, Judge KA, Paulus DJ, Jordan JT, Yopchick JE - J Health Commun (2013)

Sample visual causal model illustrating Clinician I's verbal explanation of generalized anxiety disorder and the treatment that Clinician I most typically prescribes. The wording of each phrase was taken verbatim from the clinician's explanation to correspond to the clinician's audio recording in the dual-mode condition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814909&req=5

Figure 1: Sample visual causal model illustrating Clinician I's verbal explanation of generalized anxiety disorder and the treatment that Clinician I most typically prescribes. The wording of each phrase was taken verbatim from the clinician's explanation to correspond to the clinician's audio recording in the dual-mode condition.
Mentions: Realistic auditory explanations of GAD were acquired by asking two experienced, board-certified psychiatrists what they would tell a patient just diagnosed with GAD about the disorder and the treatments they would typically prescribe. Clinicians were asked to mimic speaking to an actual patient and to confine their comments to what they would typically have time to say in an actual session. We audio-recorded these explanations, transcribed them, and then met again with each clinician. We asked them to identify from the transcript the most important points they would want their patients to take away from a real clinical session. On the basis of their feedback, we then created a visual causal model of each clinician's explanation using the Concept Builder software (Kim & Park, 2009; see Figure 1). Each clinician also generated eight questions to test participants' comprehension of the most important take-home information.

Bottom Line: Patients and lay people learned significantly more from visual causal model presentations than from auditory-only presentations, and visual causal models were perceived to be helpful.Participants retained some information 4 weeks after the presentation, although the advantage of visual causal models did not persist in the long term.In conclusion, dual-mode presentations featuring visual causal models yield significant relative gains in patient comprehension immediately after the clinical session, at a time when the authors suggest that patients may be most willing to begin the recommended treatment plan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Psychology , Northeastern University , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

ABSTRACT
A daily challenge in clinical practice is to adequately explain disorders and treatments to patients of varying levels of literacy in a time-limited situation. Drawing jointly upon research on causal reasoning and multimodal theory, the authors asked whether adding visual causal models to clinical explanations promotes patient learning. Participants were 86 people currently or formerly diagnosed with a mood disorder and 104 lay people in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, who were randomly assigned to receive either a visual causal model (dual-mode) presentation or auditory-only presentation of an explanation about generalized anxiety disorder and its treatment. Participants' knowledge was tested before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after the presentation. Patients and lay people learned significantly more from visual causal model presentations than from auditory-only presentations, and visual causal models were perceived to be helpful. Participants retained some information 4 weeks after the presentation, although the advantage of visual causal models did not persist in the long term. In conclusion, dual-mode presentations featuring visual causal models yield significant relative gains in patient comprehension immediately after the clinical session, at a time when the authors suggest that patients may be most willing to begin the recommended treatment plan.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus