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Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

Dogra VS, Chinni BK, Valluru KS, Joseph JV, Ghazi A, Yao JL, Evans K, Messing EM, Rao NA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent.Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Urology, and BME, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue.

Materials and methods: Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water.

Results: Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) and lipid (P = 0.0251) between malignant prostate and normal prostate tissue. There was difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) between malignant prostate and BPH. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.

Conclusion: Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Acoustic lens focusing. Photoacoustic signals generated from the tissue (object plane) are focused onto an ultrasound sensor array placed in the image plane, enabling real-time high speed data acquisition. Reproduced with permission from “Photoacoustic Imaging: Opening New Frontiers in Medical Imaging”. J Clin Imaging Sci 2011, 1:24.
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Figure 6: Acoustic lens focusing. Photoacoustic signals generated from the tissue (object plane) are focused onto an ultrasound sensor array placed in the image plane, enabling real-time high speed data acquisition. Reproduced with permission from “Photoacoustic Imaging: Opening New Frontiers in Medical Imaging”. J Clin Imaging Sci 2011, 1:24.

Mentions: PA image focusing in our system was achieved by using a spherical acoustic lens in contrast to electronic focusing techniques applied in the backend processing stage of conventional ultrasound systems. The lens will focus the PA signals generated in tissue plane onto an ultrasound sensor placed in its image plane [Figure 6] to detect the PA signals whose time of arrival depends on the object plane-image plane distance and the medium in which the PA waves propagate. An advantage of using a physical lens over electronic focusing is that it results in real-time DAQ besides being inexpensive. Our acoustic-lens-based EMPI device will display PA images as fast as every 0.1-0.5 s.


Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

Dogra VS, Chinni BK, Valluru KS, Joseph JV, Ghazi A, Yao JL, Evans K, Messing EM, Rao NA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Acoustic lens focusing. Photoacoustic signals generated from the tissue (object plane) are focused onto an ultrasound sensor array placed in the image plane, enabling real-time high speed data acquisition. Reproduced with permission from “Photoacoustic Imaging: Opening New Frontiers in Medical Imaging”. J Clin Imaging Sci 2011, 1:24.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814905&req=5

Figure 6: Acoustic lens focusing. Photoacoustic signals generated from the tissue (object plane) are focused onto an ultrasound sensor array placed in the image plane, enabling real-time high speed data acquisition. Reproduced with permission from “Photoacoustic Imaging: Opening New Frontiers in Medical Imaging”. J Clin Imaging Sci 2011, 1:24.
Mentions: PA image focusing in our system was achieved by using a spherical acoustic lens in contrast to electronic focusing techniques applied in the backend processing stage of conventional ultrasound systems. The lens will focus the PA signals generated in tissue plane onto an ultrasound sensor placed in its image plane [Figure 6] to detect the PA signals whose time of arrival depends on the object plane-image plane distance and the medium in which the PA waves propagate. An advantage of using a physical lens over electronic focusing is that it results in real-time DAQ besides being inexpensive. Our acoustic-lens-based EMPI device will display PA images as fast as every 0.1-0.5 s.

Bottom Line: A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent.Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Urology, and BME, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue.

Materials and methods: Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water.

Results: Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) and lipid (P = 0.0251) between malignant prostate and normal prostate tissue. There was difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) between malignant prostate and BPH. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.

Conclusion: Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus