Limits...
Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

Dogra VS, Chinni BK, Valluru KS, Joseph JV, Ghazi A, Yao JL, Evans K, Messing EM, Rao NA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent.Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Urology, and BME, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue.

Materials and methods: Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water.

Results: Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) and lipid (P = 0.0251) between malignant prostate and normal prostate tissue. There was difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) between malignant prostate and BPH. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.

Conclusion: Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photoacoustic (PA) image analysis procedure. Chromophore analysis was performed on the acquired multispectral composite PA images to extract individual optical absorption maps of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Each PA image is co-registered with the photograph of gross prostate tissue and histopathology for further evaluation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814905&req=5

Figure 2: Photoacoustic (PA) image analysis procedure. Chromophore analysis was performed on the acquired multispectral composite PA images to extract individual optical absorption maps of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Each PA image is co-registered with the photograph of gross prostate tissue and histopathology for further evaluation.

Mentions: For each excised prostate tissue, areas corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH, and normal prostate were identified and marked on the histopathology slide by a genitourinary pathologist. The digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained from the pathologist and co-registered with each of the four reconstructed CPA C-scan images in order to be able to compare the marked regions. Typically the excised prostate gland is inked using different colors prior to slicing and this ink has been generating PA signals that are recorded by our EMPI system in the raster scan process. These recorded signals from the ink act like a guided boundary outline on our CPA images for every imaged specimen. This guided boundary helped us to select the region of interest (ROI) on the CPA images using marked digital histopathology slides as ground truth. On these co-registered CPA C-scan images, ROI for malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue were defined. From each ROI, mean intensity value of all the pixels was calculated to determine the optical absorption of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Figure 2 illustrates the multispectral PA image analysis procedure. The person performing the co-registration of CPA C-scan images and histopathology images was blinded to the histopathology results.


Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Ex-vivo Results.

Dogra VS, Chinni BK, Valluru KS, Joseph JV, Ghazi A, Yao JL, Evans K, Messing EM, Rao NA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Photoacoustic (PA) image analysis procedure. Chromophore analysis was performed on the acquired multispectral composite PA images to extract individual optical absorption maps of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Each PA image is co-registered with the photograph of gross prostate tissue and histopathology for further evaluation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814905&req=5

Figure 2: Photoacoustic (PA) image analysis procedure. Chromophore analysis was performed on the acquired multispectral composite PA images to extract individual optical absorption maps of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Each PA image is co-registered with the photograph of gross prostate tissue and histopathology for further evaluation.
Mentions: For each excised prostate tissue, areas corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH, and normal prostate were identified and marked on the histopathology slide by a genitourinary pathologist. The digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained from the pathologist and co-registered with each of the four reconstructed CPA C-scan images in order to be able to compare the marked regions. Typically the excised prostate gland is inked using different colors prior to slicing and this ink has been generating PA signals that are recorded by our EMPI system in the raster scan process. These recorded signals from the ink act like a guided boundary outline on our CPA images for every imaged specimen. This guided boundary helped us to select the region of interest (ROI) on the CPA images using marked digital histopathology slides as ground truth. On these co-registered CPA C-scan images, ROI for malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue were defined. From each ROI, mean intensity value of all the pixels was calculated to determine the optical absorption of dHb, HbO2, lipid and water. Figure 2 illustrates the multispectral PA image analysis procedure. The person performing the co-registration of CPA C-scan images and histopathology images was blinded to the histopathology results.

Bottom Line: A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent.Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Urology, and BME, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of this study is to validate if ex-vivo multispectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal human prostate tissue.

Materials and methods: Institutional Review Board's approval was obtained for this study. A total of 30 patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer were included in this study with informed consent. Multispectral PA imaging was performed on surgically excised prostate tissue and chromophore images that represent optical absorption of deoxyhemoglobin (dHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), lipid, and water were reconstructed. After the imaging procedure is completed, malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate regions were marked by the genitourinary pathologist on histopathology slides and digital images of marked histopathology slides were obtained. The histopathology images were co-registered with chromophore images. Region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate were defined on the chromophore images. Pixel values within each ROI were then averaged to determine mean intensities of dHb, HbO2, lipid, and water.

Results: Our preliminary results show that there is statistically significant difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) and lipid (P = 0.0251) between malignant prostate and normal prostate tissue. There was difference in mean intensity of dHb (P < 0.0001) between malignant prostate and BPH. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of our imaging system were found to be 81.3%, 96.2%, 92.9% and 89.3% respectively.

Conclusion: Our preliminary results of ex-vivo human prostate study suggest that multispectral PA imaging can differentiate between malignant prostate, BPH and normal prostate tissue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus