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Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the upper trachea: a rare neoplasm.

Choudhury BK, Barman G, Singh S, Ahmed K - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: The patient was treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and is on regular follow-up.Follow-up at 18 months post-treatment showed no local recurrence or distant metastases.Image findings are briefly discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis, Dr. Bhubaneswar Borooah Cancer Institute, Gopinath Nagar, Guwahati, Assam, India.

ABSTRACT
Primary malignant tracheal tumors are not common and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of trachea is rare. We report an extremely rare case of ACC of proximal trachea, which was diagnosed in a 42-year-old male who presents with 6-month history of dyspnea. Lateral skiagram of neck, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad-based polypoidal soft tissue mass arising from posterior wall of the proximal trachea. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ACC. The patient was treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and is on regular follow-up. Follow-up at 18 months post-treatment showed no local recurrence or distant metastases. The literature on tracheal ACC is reviewed. Image findings are briefly discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

42-year-old man diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Sagittal magnetic resonance Short Tau Inversion Recovery image of neck shows longitudinal extent of tumor (arrow) located at the level of upper end of trachea extending to subglottis causing almost complete luminal narrowing. Tracheostomy tube is seen below the level of tumor (arrowhead).
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Figure 6: 42-year-old man diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Sagittal magnetic resonance Short Tau Inversion Recovery image of neck shows longitudinal extent of tumor (arrow) located at the level of upper end of trachea extending to subglottis causing almost complete luminal narrowing. Tracheostomy tube is seen below the level of tumor (arrowhead).

Mentions: A 42-year-old male patient presents with a 6-month history of dyspnea. General physical examination did not reveal any significant abnormality. He had no history of smoking. The hematological and biochemical profile were essentially normal. Chest radiograph was within normal limits. Plain lateral radiograph of the neck revealed a broad-based polypoidal mass arising from the posterior wall of the proximal trachea [Figure 1]. Bronchoscopy confirmed the neoplasm. Histopatholgical examination of the mass confirmed it to be an ACC [Figure 2]. Patient suddenly developed severe respiratory distress and change of voice for which emergency tracheostomy was performed. CT and MRI were advised for treatment planning. MDCT [Figures 3 and 4] revealed a broad-based polypoidal soft tissue mass arising from the posterior wall of the proximal end of the trachea just below the cricoid cartilage and extending to involve the subglottis resulting in near total luminal obstruction. The tracheal mass eroded the tracheal cartilage and was abutting the right lobe of the thyroid. MRI [Figures 5 and 6] confirmed almost similar findings like CT. Metastatic work up which included CT thorax, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan were normal. Surgical resection of the tumor was planned. Because of laryngeal extension, total laryngectomy and end-tracheostomy was performed in addition to resection of the tracheal segment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of ACC. The patient also received external beam radiation therapy following surgery. The patient was on regular follow-up after the treatment. Follow-up of the patient after 18 months post-treatment did not reveal local recurrence or distant metastases.


Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the upper trachea: a rare neoplasm.

Choudhury BK, Barman G, Singh S, Ahmed K - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

42-year-old man diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Sagittal magnetic resonance Short Tau Inversion Recovery image of neck shows longitudinal extent of tumor (arrow) located at the level of upper end of trachea extending to subglottis causing almost complete luminal narrowing. Tracheostomy tube is seen below the level of tumor (arrowhead).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814902&req=5

Figure 6: 42-year-old man diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Sagittal magnetic resonance Short Tau Inversion Recovery image of neck shows longitudinal extent of tumor (arrow) located at the level of upper end of trachea extending to subglottis causing almost complete luminal narrowing. Tracheostomy tube is seen below the level of tumor (arrowhead).
Mentions: A 42-year-old male patient presents with a 6-month history of dyspnea. General physical examination did not reveal any significant abnormality. He had no history of smoking. The hematological and biochemical profile were essentially normal. Chest radiograph was within normal limits. Plain lateral radiograph of the neck revealed a broad-based polypoidal mass arising from the posterior wall of the proximal trachea [Figure 1]. Bronchoscopy confirmed the neoplasm. Histopatholgical examination of the mass confirmed it to be an ACC [Figure 2]. Patient suddenly developed severe respiratory distress and change of voice for which emergency tracheostomy was performed. CT and MRI were advised for treatment planning. MDCT [Figures 3 and 4] revealed a broad-based polypoidal soft tissue mass arising from the posterior wall of the proximal end of the trachea just below the cricoid cartilage and extending to involve the subglottis resulting in near total luminal obstruction. The tracheal mass eroded the tracheal cartilage and was abutting the right lobe of the thyroid. MRI [Figures 5 and 6] confirmed almost similar findings like CT. Metastatic work up which included CT thorax, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan were normal. Surgical resection of the tumor was planned. Because of laryngeal extension, total laryngectomy and end-tracheostomy was performed in addition to resection of the tracheal segment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of ACC. The patient also received external beam radiation therapy following surgery. The patient was on regular follow-up after the treatment. Follow-up of the patient after 18 months post-treatment did not reveal local recurrence or distant metastases.

Bottom Line: The patient was treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and is on regular follow-up.Follow-up at 18 months post-treatment showed no local recurrence or distant metastases.Image findings are briefly discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis, Dr. Bhubaneswar Borooah Cancer Institute, Gopinath Nagar, Guwahati, Assam, India.

ABSTRACT
Primary malignant tracheal tumors are not common and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of trachea is rare. We report an extremely rare case of ACC of proximal trachea, which was diagnosed in a 42-year-old male who presents with 6-month history of dyspnea. Lateral skiagram of neck, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad-based polypoidal soft tissue mass arising from posterior wall of the proximal trachea. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ACC. The patient was treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and is on regular follow-up. Follow-up at 18 months post-treatment showed no local recurrence or distant metastases. The literature on tracheal ACC is reviewed. Image findings are briefly discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus