Limits...
A review on natural background radiation.

Shahbazi-Gahrouei D, Gholami M, Setayandeh S - Adv Biomed Res (2013)

Bottom Line: Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly (232)Th and (238)U series, and their decay products, as well as (40)K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust.Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world.The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
The world is naturally radioactive and approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of control, arise from natural sources such as cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure from inhalation or intake radiation sources. In recent years, several international studies have been carried out, which have reported different values regarding the effect of background radiation on human health. Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly (232)Th and (238)U series, and their decay products, as well as (40)K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust. Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world. Naturally occurring radioactive materials generally contain terrestrial-origin radionuclides, left over since the creation of the earth. In addition, the existence of some springs and quarries increases the dose rate of background radiation in some regions that are known as high level background radiation regions. The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations. The present review article was carried out to consider all of the natural radiations, including cosmic, terrestrial, and food radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The ordinate shows the neutron dose rate. The curve with the lower slope shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level multiplied by 300 as a function of the magnetic latitude on the abscissa. The steeper curve shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at 12.5 km altitude as a function of the magnetic latitude
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Figure 1: The ordinate shows the neutron dose rate. The curve with the lower slope shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level multiplied by 300 as a function of the magnetic latitude on the abscissa. The steeper curve shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at 12.5 km altitude as a function of the magnetic latitude

Mentions: Cosmic radiation increases with magnetic latitude, especially at higher elevations. For example, at 12.5 km altitude, the dose rate from neutrons alone increases from 8 mSv/year at a magnetic latitude of 25° to 19 mSv/year at a magnetic latitude of 50°.[7] Figure 1 shows how the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level and at 12.5 km altitude depends on the magnetic latitude.[7] The neutron dose rate at sea level and magnetic latitude of 43° is seen to be approximately 300 times smaller than that at 12.5 km over sea level. At a magnetic latitude of 50°, the cosmic neutron dose at a height of 12.5 km over sea level is about 20 mSv/year, whereas at the ground level and at the same magnetic latitude, the cosmic ray neutron dose is about 19/300 = 0.063 mSv/year.[7]


A review on natural background radiation.

Shahbazi-Gahrouei D, Gholami M, Setayandeh S - Adv Biomed Res (2013)

The ordinate shows the neutron dose rate. The curve with the lower slope shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level multiplied by 300 as a function of the magnetic latitude on the abscissa. The steeper curve shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at 12.5 km altitude as a function of the magnetic latitude
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814895&req=5

Figure 1: The ordinate shows the neutron dose rate. The curve with the lower slope shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level multiplied by 300 as a function of the magnetic latitude on the abscissa. The steeper curve shows the cosmic neutron dose rate at 12.5 km altitude as a function of the magnetic latitude
Mentions: Cosmic radiation increases with magnetic latitude, especially at higher elevations. For example, at 12.5 km altitude, the dose rate from neutrons alone increases from 8 mSv/year at a magnetic latitude of 25° to 19 mSv/year at a magnetic latitude of 50°.[7] Figure 1 shows how the cosmic neutron dose rate at sea level and at 12.5 km altitude depends on the magnetic latitude.[7] The neutron dose rate at sea level and magnetic latitude of 43° is seen to be approximately 300 times smaller than that at 12.5 km over sea level. At a magnetic latitude of 50°, the cosmic neutron dose at a height of 12.5 km over sea level is about 20 mSv/year, whereas at the ground level and at the same magnetic latitude, the cosmic ray neutron dose is about 19/300 = 0.063 mSv/year.[7]

Bottom Line: Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly (232)Th and (238)U series, and their decay products, as well as (40)K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust.Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world.The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
The world is naturally radioactive and approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of control, arise from natural sources such as cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure from inhalation or intake radiation sources. In recent years, several international studies have been carried out, which have reported different values regarding the effect of background radiation on human health. Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly (232)Th and (238)U series, and their decay products, as well as (40)K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust. Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world. Naturally occurring radioactive materials generally contain terrestrial-origin radionuclides, left over since the creation of the earth. In addition, the existence of some springs and quarries increases the dose rate of background radiation in some regions that are known as high level background radiation regions. The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations. The present review article was carried out to consider all of the natural radiations, including cosmic, terrestrial, and food radiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus