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Development of a Molecularly Imprinted Biomimetic Electrode

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The technique of molecular imprinting produces artificial receptor sites in a polymer that can be used in a biomimetic sensor. This research extends previous studies of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) biomimetic sensor for the small drug theophylline. The presence of theophylline in the biomimetic sensor was monitored by analyzing the peak currents from cyclic voltammetry experiments. The functional working range of the MIP modified electrode was 2 - 4 mM theophylline. The concentration of theophylline that resulted in the best signal was 3 mM. The MIP sensor showed no response to the structurally related molecule caffeine, and therefore was selective to the target analyte theophylline. This research will provide the foundation for future studies that will result in durable biomimetic sensors that can offer a viable alternative to current sensors.

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Chemical structures of (a) theophylline and (b) caffeine [10].
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f3-sensors-07-01630: Chemical structures of (a) theophylline and (b) caffeine [10].

Mentions: The selectivity of the MIP sensor was evaluated using caffeine, which is structurally related to the target analyte, theophylline. As shown in Figure 3, the structures of theophylline and caffeine differ primarily in the group attached to the nitrogen atom. In theophylline, this group is a single hydrogen atom while in caffeine this is a CH3 group. This slight structural difference makes caffeine ideal for testing the crossreactivity of the theophylline-imprinted polymer sensor. The selectivity testing was performed using four concentrations of caffeine: 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM.


Development of a Molecularly Imprinted Biomimetic Electrode
Chemical structures of (a) theophylline and (b) caffeine [10].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814872&req=5

f3-sensors-07-01630: Chemical structures of (a) theophylline and (b) caffeine [10].
Mentions: The selectivity of the MIP sensor was evaluated using caffeine, which is structurally related to the target analyte, theophylline. As shown in Figure 3, the structures of theophylline and caffeine differ primarily in the group attached to the nitrogen atom. In theophylline, this group is a single hydrogen atom while in caffeine this is a CH3 group. This slight structural difference makes caffeine ideal for testing the crossreactivity of the theophylline-imprinted polymer sensor. The selectivity testing was performed using four concentrations of caffeine: 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The technique of molecular imprinting produces artificial receptor sites in a polymer that can be used in a biomimetic sensor. This research extends previous studies of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) biomimetic sensor for the small drug theophylline. The presence of theophylline in the biomimetic sensor was monitored by analyzing the peak currents from cyclic voltammetry experiments. The functional working range of the MIP modified electrode was 2 - 4 mM theophylline. The concentration of theophylline that resulted in the best signal was 3 mM. The MIP sensor showed no response to the structurally related molecule caffeine, and therefore was selective to the target analyte theophylline. This research will provide the foundation for future studies that will result in durable biomimetic sensors that can offer a viable alternative to current sensors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus