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Differentiation of Toxic Molds via Headspace SPME-GC/MS and Canine Detection

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Indoor mold growth has recently become a concern in the legal world in regards to insurance litigation. Hazardous mold exposure to humans has been linked to many acute and chronic adverse health effects including death. As it grows, mold produces several types of primary and secondary metabolites, including microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). Microbial volatile organic compound emission may be used as a preliminary indication of a mold infestation that is invisible to the unaided eye. The objective of the study is to identify the unique odor signatures of three species of molds, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Stachybotrys chartarum by SPME-GC/MS analysis. Determining the compounds that are emitted by the selected species has made it possible to conduct validation studies of canine detection of these mold species through a series of field tests.

No MeSH data available.


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Chromatogram of Penicillium chrysogenum, CW/DVB, 18 hour exposure.
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f4-sensors-07-01496: Chromatogram of Penicillium chrysogenum, CW/DVB, 18 hour exposure.

Mentions: Similarly, a variety of compounds were observed from the headspace of the Penicillium chrysogenum, as shown in Figure 4. Nineteen collective microbial volatile organic compounds were extracted from the headspace of Penicillium chrysogenum and detected by SPME-GC/MS analysis: arsenous acid, 1-methoxycyclohexane, furan, 1-hexanol, nonanal, hexanoic acid, benzene, naphthalene, 1-undecanol, oxirane, cyclododecane, dodecanoic acid, butyl caprate, 1-docosene, tetradecanoic acid, Z,E-2-methyl-3,13-octadecadien-1-ol, n-butyl laurate, 1-heptadecanol, and 1,4,7,10,13,16,19-heptaoxa-2-cycloheneicosanone. Compounds detected in the headspace of PDA were subtracted from the list of compounds detected in the headspace of Penicillium chrysogenum, as they cannot be proven to be microbial volatile organic compounds. Table 2 below list the compounds detected, as well as their retention times and % peak areas.


Differentiation of Toxic Molds via Headspace SPME-GC/MS and Canine Detection
Chromatogram of Penicillium chrysogenum, CW/DVB, 18 hour exposure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814865&req=5

f4-sensors-07-01496: Chromatogram of Penicillium chrysogenum, CW/DVB, 18 hour exposure.
Mentions: Similarly, a variety of compounds were observed from the headspace of the Penicillium chrysogenum, as shown in Figure 4. Nineteen collective microbial volatile organic compounds were extracted from the headspace of Penicillium chrysogenum and detected by SPME-GC/MS analysis: arsenous acid, 1-methoxycyclohexane, furan, 1-hexanol, nonanal, hexanoic acid, benzene, naphthalene, 1-undecanol, oxirane, cyclododecane, dodecanoic acid, butyl caprate, 1-docosene, tetradecanoic acid, Z,E-2-methyl-3,13-octadecadien-1-ol, n-butyl laurate, 1-heptadecanol, and 1,4,7,10,13,16,19-heptaoxa-2-cycloheneicosanone. Compounds detected in the headspace of PDA were subtracted from the list of compounds detected in the headspace of Penicillium chrysogenum, as they cannot be proven to be microbial volatile organic compounds. Table 2 below list the compounds detected, as well as their retention times and % peak areas.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Indoor mold growth has recently become a concern in the legal world in regards to insurance litigation. Hazardous mold exposure to humans has been linked to many acute and chronic adverse health effects including death. As it grows, mold produces several types of primary and secondary metabolites, including microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). Microbial volatile organic compound emission may be used as a preliminary indication of a mold infestation that is invisible to the unaided eye. The objective of the study is to identify the unique odor signatures of three species of molds, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Stachybotrys chartarum by SPME-GC/MS analysis. Determining the compounds that are emitted by the selected species has made it possible to conduct validation studies of canine detection of these mold species through a series of field tests.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus