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Preemptive subcutaneous tramadol for post-operative pain in lower abdomen surgeries: A randomized double blinded placebo-control study.

Jabalameli M, Hazegh P, Talakoub R - Adv Biomed Res (2013)

Bottom Line: The visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) in rest and cough position and opium total dose consumption were compared between two groups in times 0, 15, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 h after the surgery.The VAS in cough and rest position in the first 24 h following the surgery was lower in group T (P < 0.05).Opium consumption was lower in group T (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recently, the preemptive analgesic effects of subcutaneous infiltration of tramadol (T) in the site of incision have not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of subcutaneous T infiltration before the incision of surgery on post-operative pain, in lower abdomen surgeries.

Materials and methods: This double-blind study was carried out on 90 patients (18-65 years) of American Society Anesthesiologists physical status I and II who were candidates for a lower abdomen surgery during 2011. They were randomly assigned to receive preemptive subcutaneous T or normal saline (NS). The visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) in rest and cough position and opium total dose consumption were compared between two groups in times 0, 15, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 h after the surgery.

Results: The VAS in cough and rest position in the first 24 h following the surgery was lower in group T (P < 0.05). Opium consumption was lower in group T (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Subcutaneous preemptive infiltration of T before surgical incision reduces post-operative opioid consumption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of enrolled study patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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Figure 1: Flow diagram of enrolled study patients

Mentions: All patients completed the study [Figure 1]. The 90 patients enrolled in the study were divided into two groups. There were no significant differences in the demographic data of the patients [Table 1].


Preemptive subcutaneous tramadol for post-operative pain in lower abdomen surgeries: A randomized double blinded placebo-control study.

Jabalameli M, Hazegh P, Talakoub R - Adv Biomed Res (2013)

Flow diagram of enrolled study patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814855&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of enrolled study patients
Mentions: All patients completed the study [Figure 1]. The 90 patients enrolled in the study were divided into two groups. There were no significant differences in the demographic data of the patients [Table 1].

Bottom Line: The visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) in rest and cough position and opium total dose consumption were compared between two groups in times 0, 15, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 h after the surgery.The VAS in cough and rest position in the first 24 h following the surgery was lower in group T (P < 0.05).Opium consumption was lower in group T (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recently, the preemptive analgesic effects of subcutaneous infiltration of tramadol (T) in the site of incision have not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of subcutaneous T infiltration before the incision of surgery on post-operative pain, in lower abdomen surgeries.

Materials and methods: This double-blind study was carried out on 90 patients (18-65 years) of American Society Anesthesiologists physical status I and II who were candidates for a lower abdomen surgery during 2011. They were randomly assigned to receive preemptive subcutaneous T or normal saline (NS). The visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) in rest and cough position and opium total dose consumption were compared between two groups in times 0, 15, 30, 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 h after the surgery.

Results: The VAS in cough and rest position in the first 24 h following the surgery was lower in group T (P < 0.05). Opium consumption was lower in group T (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Subcutaneous preemptive infiltration of T before surgical incision reduces post-operative opioid consumption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus