Limits...
Levoglucosan indicates high levels of biomass burning aerosols over oceans from the Arctic to Antarctic.

Hu QH, Xie ZQ, Wang XM, Kang H, Zhang P - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Here we report the molecular tracer levoglucosan concentrations in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to Antarctica during burning season.Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m(3) levels with the highest atmospheric loadings present in the mid-latitudes (30°-60° N and S), intermediate loadings in the Arctic, and lowest loadings in the Antarctic and equatorial latitudes.As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Institute of Polar Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China [2].

ABSTRACT
Biomass burning is known to affect air quality, global carbon cycle, and climate. However, the extent to which biomass burning gases/aerosols are present on a global scale, especially in the marine atmosphere, is poorly understood. Here we report the molecular tracer levoglucosan concentrations in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to Antarctica during burning season. Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m(3) levels with the highest atmospheric loadings present in the mid-latitudes (30°-60° N and S), intermediate loadings in the Arctic, and lowest loadings in the Antarctic and equatorial latitudes. As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere. Biomass burning has a significant impact on atmospheric Hg and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) from pole-to-pole, with more contribution to WSOC in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer.Circles represent data from this study; triangles represent data obtained from an around-the-world cruise17; four squares are average levels over East China Sea, Sea of Japan, Pacific (west of 140° E) and Pacific (east of 140° E) during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment campaign18; the diamond is the mean level at Alert (82.5° N, 62.3° W) from winter to spring27; the hexagon is the average level over the southern Beaufort Sea in summer 200919; the pentagon is the annual mean level on the island of Chichi-jima in the western North Pacific (27°4′ N, 142°13′ E)21; the star is the annual mean level on the island of Azores in the North Atlantic (38°38′ N, 27°2′ W)20. Base map is from ArcGIS software.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814847&req=5

f1: Global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer.Circles represent data from this study; triangles represent data obtained from an around-the-world cruise17; four squares are average levels over East China Sea, Sea of Japan, Pacific (west of 140° E) and Pacific (east of 140° E) during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment campaign18; the diamond is the mean level at Alert (82.5° N, 62.3° W) from winter to spring27; the hexagon is the average level over the southern Beaufort Sea in summer 200919; the pentagon is the annual mean level on the island of Chichi-jima in the western North Pacific (27°4′ N, 142°13′ E)21; the star is the annual mean level on the island of Azores in the North Atlantic (38°38′ N, 27°2′ W)20. Base map is from ArcGIS software.

Mentions: Levoglucosan and WSOC varied over a wide range during the cruises (Figure S1). Levoglucosan ranged from 0.18 to 41 ng/m3, with a mean of 5.4 ± 6.2 ng/m3. There was no significant difference between levoglucosan concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere and those in the Southern Hemisphere (P = 0.2). WSOC ranged from 86 to 3850 ng/m3, with an average of 859 ± 673 ng/m3. WSOC from biomass burning (WSOCBB), calculated by the levoglucosan/WSOC conversion factor of 0.10 μg/μgC according to the biomass burning plume in Georgia, US24, ranged from 1.8 to 414 ng/m3, with an average of 54 ± 62 ng/m3. Combined with results reported in the literature, the global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer is summarized in Figure 1 and discussed in detail below.


Levoglucosan indicates high levels of biomass burning aerosols over oceans from the Arctic to Antarctic.

Hu QH, Xie ZQ, Wang XM, Kang H, Zhang P - Sci Rep (2013)

Global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer.Circles represent data from this study; triangles represent data obtained from an around-the-world cruise17; four squares are average levels over East China Sea, Sea of Japan, Pacific (west of 140° E) and Pacific (east of 140° E) during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment campaign18; the diamond is the mean level at Alert (82.5° N, 62.3° W) from winter to spring27; the hexagon is the average level over the southern Beaufort Sea in summer 200919; the pentagon is the annual mean level on the island of Chichi-jima in the western North Pacific (27°4′ N, 142°13′ E)21; the star is the annual mean level on the island of Azores in the North Atlantic (38°38′ N, 27°2′ W)20. Base map is from ArcGIS software.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814847&req=5

f1: Global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer.Circles represent data from this study; triangles represent data obtained from an around-the-world cruise17; four squares are average levels over East China Sea, Sea of Japan, Pacific (west of 140° E) and Pacific (east of 140° E) during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment campaign18; the diamond is the mean level at Alert (82.5° N, 62.3° W) from winter to spring27; the hexagon is the average level over the southern Beaufort Sea in summer 200919; the pentagon is the annual mean level on the island of Chichi-jima in the western North Pacific (27°4′ N, 142°13′ E)21; the star is the annual mean level on the island of Azores in the North Atlantic (38°38′ N, 27°2′ W)20. Base map is from ArcGIS software.
Mentions: Levoglucosan and WSOC varied over a wide range during the cruises (Figure S1). Levoglucosan ranged from 0.18 to 41 ng/m3, with a mean of 5.4 ± 6.2 ng/m3. There was no significant difference between levoglucosan concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere and those in the Southern Hemisphere (P = 0.2). WSOC ranged from 86 to 3850 ng/m3, with an average of 859 ± 673 ng/m3. WSOC from biomass burning (WSOCBB), calculated by the levoglucosan/WSOC conversion factor of 0.10 μg/μgC according to the biomass burning plume in Georgia, US24, ranged from 1.8 to 414 ng/m3, with an average of 54 ± 62 ng/m3. Combined with results reported in the literature, the global distribution of levoglucosan in the marine boundary layer is summarized in Figure 1 and discussed in detail below.

Bottom Line: Here we report the molecular tracer levoglucosan concentrations in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to Antarctica during burning season.Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m(3) levels with the highest atmospheric loadings present in the mid-latitudes (30°-60° N and S), intermediate loadings in the Arctic, and lowest loadings in the Antarctic and equatorial latitudes.As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Institute of Polar Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China [2].

ABSTRACT
Biomass burning is known to affect air quality, global carbon cycle, and climate. However, the extent to which biomass burning gases/aerosols are present on a global scale, especially in the marine atmosphere, is poorly understood. Here we report the molecular tracer levoglucosan concentrations in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to Antarctica during burning season. Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m(3) levels with the highest atmospheric loadings present in the mid-latitudes (30°-60° N and S), intermediate loadings in the Arctic, and lowest loadings in the Antarctic and equatorial latitudes. As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere. Biomass burning has a significant impact on atmospheric Hg and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) from pole-to-pole, with more contribution to WSOC in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus