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Prevalence of selected bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana.

Hill DD, Owens WE, Tchounwou PB - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2005)

Bottom Line: The number of reported cases of shigellosis was found to be higher in African American males and females than in Caucasians.The high rate of identification in the younger population may result from the prompt seeking of medical care, as well as the frequent ordering of stool examination when symptoms become evident among this group of the population.It is concluded that both animal waste and non-point source pollution may have a significant impact on human health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

ABSTRACT
Human health is a major concern when considering the disposal of large quantities of animal waste. Health concerns could arise from exposure to pathogens and excess nitrogen associated with this form of pollution. The objective was to collect and analyze health data related to selected bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana. An analysis of adverse health effects has been conducted based on the incidence/prevalence rates of campylobacteriosis, E. coli O157:H7 infection, salmonellosis and shigellosis. The number of reported cases increased during the summer months. Analysis of health data showed that reported disease cases of E. coli O157:H7 were highest among Caucasian infants in the 0-4 year old age category and in Caucasian children in the 5-9 year old age category. Fatalities resulting from salmonellosis are low and increases sharply with age. The number of reported cases of shigellosis was found to be higher in African American males and females than in Caucasians. The high rate of identification in the younger population may result from the prompt seeking of medical care, as well as the frequent ordering of stool examination when symptoms become evident among this group of the population. The association with increasing age and fatality due to salmonellosis could be attributed to declining health and weaker immune systems often found in the older population. It is concluded that both animal waste and non-point source pollution may have a significant impact on human health.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

E. coli O157:H7 average incidence rates by race and age for the years 1996–2001 in Louisiana (LDHH 2001).
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f2-ijerph-02-00084: E. coli O157:H7 average incidence rates by race and age for the years 1996–2001 in Louisiana (LDHH 2001).

Mentions: Figure 2 shows that of the years 1996–2001, the majority of the cases were reported for young Caucasian infants and children between the ages of 0 and 9 years of age. The highest number of cases reported during the years of 1996–2001 was found in St. Tammany Parish with a total of 11 cases. Figure 3 shows that the E. coli O157:H7 number of cases reported increased during the months of June, July, August and November. These months reported 12, 13, and 9 cases, respectively. During 1999, sixty-four percent of the cases reported occurred between the months of June and September. For the years of 1996–2001, 1 case was reported during the month of February [12].


Prevalence of selected bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana.

Hill DD, Owens WE, Tchounwou PB - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2005)

E. coli O157:H7 average incidence rates by race and age for the years 1996–2001 in Louisiana (LDHH 2001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814701&req=5

f2-ijerph-02-00084: E. coli O157:H7 average incidence rates by race and age for the years 1996–2001 in Louisiana (LDHH 2001).
Mentions: Figure 2 shows that of the years 1996–2001, the majority of the cases were reported for young Caucasian infants and children between the ages of 0 and 9 years of age. The highest number of cases reported during the years of 1996–2001 was found in St. Tammany Parish with a total of 11 cases. Figure 3 shows that the E. coli O157:H7 number of cases reported increased during the months of June, July, August and November. These months reported 12, 13, and 9 cases, respectively. During 1999, sixty-four percent of the cases reported occurred between the months of June and September. For the years of 1996–2001, 1 case was reported during the month of February [12].

Bottom Line: The number of reported cases of shigellosis was found to be higher in African American males and females than in Caucasians.The high rate of identification in the younger population may result from the prompt seeking of medical care, as well as the frequent ordering of stool examination when symptoms become evident among this group of the population.It is concluded that both animal waste and non-point source pollution may have a significant impact on human health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

ABSTRACT
Human health is a major concern when considering the disposal of large quantities of animal waste. Health concerns could arise from exposure to pathogens and excess nitrogen associated with this form of pollution. The objective was to collect and analyze health data related to selected bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana. An analysis of adverse health effects has been conducted based on the incidence/prevalence rates of campylobacteriosis, E. coli O157:H7 infection, salmonellosis and shigellosis. The number of reported cases increased during the summer months. Analysis of health data showed that reported disease cases of E. coli O157:H7 were highest among Caucasian infants in the 0-4 year old age category and in Caucasian children in the 5-9 year old age category. Fatalities resulting from salmonellosis are low and increases sharply with age. The number of reported cases of shigellosis was found to be higher in African American males and females than in Caucasians. The high rate of identification in the younger population may result from the prompt seeking of medical care, as well as the frequent ordering of stool examination when symptoms become evident among this group of the population. The association with increasing age and fatality due to salmonellosis could be attributed to declining health and weaker immune systems often found in the older population. It is concluded that both animal waste and non-point source pollution may have a significant impact on human health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus