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Cross-modal signatures in maternal speech and singing.

Trehub SE, Plantinga J, Brcic J, Nowicki M - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: They successfully identified the previously heard speaker.They failed to identify the previously heard singer.Adults successfully identified the talkers and they also identified the singers from videos of different portions of the song previously heard.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Music Development Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga Mississauga, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored the possibility of a unique cross-modal signature in maternal speech and singing that enables adults and infants to link unfamiliar speaking or singing voices with subsequently viewed silent videos of the talkers or singers. In Experiment 1, adults listened to 30-s excerpts of speech followed by successively presented 7-s silent video clips, one from the previously heard speaker (different speech content) and the other from a different speaker. They successfully identified the previously heard speaker. In Experiment 2, adults heard comparable excerpts of singing followed by silent video clips from the previously heard singer (different song) and another singer. They failed to identify the previously heard singer. In Experiment 3, the videos of talkers and singers were blurred to obscure mouth movements. Adults successfully identified the talkers and they also identified the singers from videos of different portions of the song previously heard. In Experiment 4, 6- to 8-month-old infants listened to 30-s excerpts of the same maternal speech or singing followed by exposure to the silent videos on alternating trials. They looked longer at the silent videos of previously heard talkers and singers. The findings confirm the individuality of maternal speech and singing performance as well as adults' and infants' ability to discern the unique cross-modal signatures. The cues that enable cross-modal matching of talker and singer identity remain to be determined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adults' proportion of correct responses for maternal singing with unaltered videos from different songs (solid bar) or altered videos from the same song (hatched bar). Error bars are standard errors.
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Figure 3: Adults' proportion of correct responses for maternal singing with unaltered videos from different songs (solid bar) or altered videos from the same song (hatched bar). Error bars are standard errors.

Mentions: Adults' selection of the matching videos (M = 0.5, SD = 0.60) was at chance levels (see Figure 3, solid bar), indicating that different maternal songs did not provide a common audiovisual signature, as was the case for maternal speech in Experiment 1. Previous research revealed that altering the manner of speech (e.g., statement to question; conversational speech to clear speech) between auditory familiarization and visual test impaired adults' performance on the delayed matching-to-sample task (Lander et al., 2007). When singing to infants, mothers may alter their performing style across songs to highlight the distinctiveness of each song or their own expressive intentions. It is possible, however, that cross-modal correspondences in maternal singing would be evident in the context of specific songs.


Cross-modal signatures in maternal speech and singing.

Trehub SE, Plantinga J, Brcic J, Nowicki M - Front Psychol (2013)

Adults' proportion of correct responses for maternal singing with unaltered videos from different songs (solid bar) or altered videos from the same song (hatched bar). Error bars are standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814622&req=5

Figure 3: Adults' proportion of correct responses for maternal singing with unaltered videos from different songs (solid bar) or altered videos from the same song (hatched bar). Error bars are standard errors.
Mentions: Adults' selection of the matching videos (M = 0.5, SD = 0.60) was at chance levels (see Figure 3, solid bar), indicating that different maternal songs did not provide a common audiovisual signature, as was the case for maternal speech in Experiment 1. Previous research revealed that altering the manner of speech (e.g., statement to question; conversational speech to clear speech) between auditory familiarization and visual test impaired adults' performance on the delayed matching-to-sample task (Lander et al., 2007). When singing to infants, mothers may alter their performing style across songs to highlight the distinctiveness of each song or their own expressive intentions. It is possible, however, that cross-modal correspondences in maternal singing would be evident in the context of specific songs.

Bottom Line: They successfully identified the previously heard speaker.They failed to identify the previously heard singer.Adults successfully identified the talkers and they also identified the singers from videos of different portions of the song previously heard.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Music Development Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga Mississauga, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We explored the possibility of a unique cross-modal signature in maternal speech and singing that enables adults and infants to link unfamiliar speaking or singing voices with subsequently viewed silent videos of the talkers or singers. In Experiment 1, adults listened to 30-s excerpts of speech followed by successively presented 7-s silent video clips, one from the previously heard speaker (different speech content) and the other from a different speaker. They successfully identified the previously heard speaker. In Experiment 2, adults heard comparable excerpts of singing followed by silent video clips from the previously heard singer (different song) and another singer. They failed to identify the previously heard singer. In Experiment 3, the videos of talkers and singers were blurred to obscure mouth movements. Adults successfully identified the talkers and they also identified the singers from videos of different portions of the song previously heard. In Experiment 4, 6- to 8-month-old infants listened to 30-s excerpts of the same maternal speech or singing followed by exposure to the silent videos on alternating trials. They looked longer at the silent videos of previously heard talkers and singers. The findings confirm the individuality of maternal speech and singing performance as well as adults' and infants' ability to discern the unique cross-modal signatures. The cues that enable cross-modal matching of talker and singer identity remain to be determined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus