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Rethinking adherence: a health literacy-informed model of medication self-management.

Bailey SC, Oramasionwu CU, Wolf MS - J Health Commun (2013)

Bottom Line: Medication adherence has received a great deal of attention over the past several decades; however, its definition and measurement remain elusive.The authors propose a new definition of medication self-management that is guided by evidence from the field of health literacy.Specifically, a new conceptual model is introduced that deconstructs the tasks associated with taking prescription drugs; including the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary for patients to correctly take medications and sustain use over time in ambulatory care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy , University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

ABSTRACT
Medication adherence has received a great deal of attention over the past several decades; however, its definition and measurement remain elusive. The authors propose a new definition of medication self-management that is guided by evidence from the field of health literacy. Specifically, a new conceptual model is introduced that deconstructs the tasks associated with taking prescription drugs; including the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary for patients to correctly take medications and sustain use over time in ambulatory care. This model is then used to review and criticize current adherence measures as well as to offer guidance to future interventions promoting medication self-management, especially among patients with low literacy skills.

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Model of medication self-management. (Color figure available online.)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Model of medication self-management. (Color figure available online.)

Mentions: Considering this definition, it is possible to deconstruct medication self-management to identify the series of steps a patient must take to safely and effectively take their medications in ambulatory care (see Figure 1). Because the focus of this model is on outpatient settings, the model begins after the physician encounter and assumes that the patient has been prescribed a medication that they are responsible for self-administering.


Rethinking adherence: a health literacy-informed model of medication self-management.

Bailey SC, Oramasionwu CU, Wolf MS - J Health Commun (2013)

Model of medication self-management. (Color figure available online.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814610&req=5

Figure 1: Model of medication self-management. (Color figure available online.)
Mentions: Considering this definition, it is possible to deconstruct medication self-management to identify the series of steps a patient must take to safely and effectively take their medications in ambulatory care (see Figure 1). Because the focus of this model is on outpatient settings, the model begins after the physician encounter and assumes that the patient has been prescribed a medication that they are responsible for self-administering.

Bottom Line: Medication adherence has received a great deal of attention over the past several decades; however, its definition and measurement remain elusive.The authors propose a new definition of medication self-management that is guided by evidence from the field of health literacy.Specifically, a new conceptual model is introduced that deconstructs the tasks associated with taking prescription drugs; including the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary for patients to correctly take medications and sustain use over time in ambulatory care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy , University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

ABSTRACT
Medication adherence has received a great deal of attention over the past several decades; however, its definition and measurement remain elusive. The authors propose a new definition of medication self-management that is guided by evidence from the field of health literacy. Specifically, a new conceptual model is introduced that deconstructs the tasks associated with taking prescription drugs; including the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary for patients to correctly take medications and sustain use over time in ambulatory care. This model is then used to review and criticize current adherence measures as well as to offer guidance to future interventions promoting medication self-management, especially among patients with low literacy skills.

Show MeSH