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Chlorophyll breakdown in senescent banana leaves: catabolism reprogrammed for biosynthesis of persistent blue fluorescent tetrapyrroles.

Vergeiner C, Banala S, Kräutler B - Chemistry (2013)

Bottom Line: Amazingly, in the leaves of banana plants, persistent hmFCCs were identified that accounted for about 80 % of the chlorophyll broken down, and yellow leaves of M. acuminata display a strong blue luminescence.The structures of eight hmFCCs from banana leaves were analyzed by spectroscopic means.As expressed earlier in related studies, the present findings call for attention, as to still elusive biological roles of these linear tetrapyrroles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organic Chemistry & Center for Molecular Biosciences, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria).

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HPLC analysis of chlorophyll catabolites in an extract of yellow senescent banana leaves (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). The chromatogram was recorded with online detection of absorbance at 320 nm (lower trace) and fluorescence emission at 450 nm (upper trace, excitation at 350 nm). Fractions classified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) are highlighted and indexed according to the retention times (tR) observed under conditions of a standard analytical HPLC experiment.[20, 23] FCCs from banana leaves were thus named Ma-FCC-tR.
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fig02: HPLC analysis of chlorophyll catabolites in an extract of yellow senescent banana leaves (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). The chromatogram was recorded with online detection of absorbance at 320 nm (lower trace) and fluorescence emission at 450 nm (upper trace, excitation at 350 nm). Fractions classified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) are highlighted and indexed according to the retention times (tR) observed under conditions of a standard analytical HPLC experiment.[20, 23] FCCs from banana leaves were thus named Ma-FCC-tR.

Mentions: Chlorophyll catabolites in senescent banana leaves: In freshly prepared extracts of yellow senescent leaves from bananas (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar, short Ma) about a dozen of blue fluorescent fractions were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), all of which were tentatively identified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) on the basis of their fluorescence and their absorbance characteristics.[11] Surprisingly, nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs), the typically more abundant chlorophyll catabolites in leaves,[6] could not be detected in fresh extracts of yellow banana leaves (Figure 2 and the Experimental Section).


Chlorophyll breakdown in senescent banana leaves: catabolism reprogrammed for biosynthesis of persistent blue fluorescent tetrapyrroles.

Vergeiner C, Banala S, Kräutler B - Chemistry (2013)

HPLC analysis of chlorophyll catabolites in an extract of yellow senescent banana leaves (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). The chromatogram was recorded with online detection of absorbance at 320 nm (lower trace) and fluorescence emission at 450 nm (upper trace, excitation at 350 nm). Fractions classified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) are highlighted and indexed according to the retention times (tR) observed under conditions of a standard analytical HPLC experiment.[20, 23] FCCs from banana leaves were thus named Ma-FCC-tR.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814416&req=5

fig02: HPLC analysis of chlorophyll catabolites in an extract of yellow senescent banana leaves (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). The chromatogram was recorded with online detection of absorbance at 320 nm (lower trace) and fluorescence emission at 450 nm (upper trace, excitation at 350 nm). Fractions classified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) are highlighted and indexed according to the retention times (tR) observed under conditions of a standard analytical HPLC experiment.[20, 23] FCCs from banana leaves were thus named Ma-FCC-tR.
Mentions: Chlorophyll catabolites in senescent banana leaves: In freshly prepared extracts of yellow senescent leaves from bananas (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar, short Ma) about a dozen of blue fluorescent fractions were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), all of which were tentatively identified as fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) on the basis of their fluorescence and their absorbance characteristics.[11] Surprisingly, nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs), the typically more abundant chlorophyll catabolites in leaves,[6] could not be detected in fresh extracts of yellow banana leaves (Figure 2 and the Experimental Section).

Bottom Line: Amazingly, in the leaves of banana plants, persistent hmFCCs were identified that accounted for about 80 % of the chlorophyll broken down, and yellow leaves of M. acuminata display a strong blue luminescence.The structures of eight hmFCCs from banana leaves were analyzed by spectroscopic means.As expressed earlier in related studies, the present findings call for attention, as to still elusive biological roles of these linear tetrapyrroles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organic Chemistry & Center for Molecular Biosciences, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus