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Greatest 'HITS': A new tool for tracking impacts at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Drew CH, Pettibone KG, Ruben E - Res Eval (2013)

Bottom Line: Understanding impacts is beneficial because it fosters a greater sense of accountability and stewardship for federal research dollars.We have downloaded previously un-searchable data from the central NIH grants database and developed a robust coding schema to help us track research products (going beyond publication counts to the content of publications) as well as research impacts.We describe the coding schema and key system features as well as several development challenges, including data integration, development of a final data structure from three separate ontologies, and ways to develop consensus about codes among program staff.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Program Analysis Branch, 530 Morrisville, NC 27560, USA.

ABSTRACT
Evaluators of scientific research programs have several tools to document and analyze products of scientific research, but few tools exist for exploring and capturing the impacts of such research. Understanding impacts is beneficial because it fosters a greater sense of accountability and stewardship for federal research dollars. This article presents the High Impacts Tracking System (HITS), a new approach to documenting research impacts that is in development at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). HITS is designed to help identify scientific advances in the NIEHS research portfolio as they emerge, and provide a robust data structure to capture those advances. We have downloaded previously un-searchable data from the central NIH grants database and developed a robust coding schema to help us track research products (going beyond publication counts to the content of publications) as well as research impacts. We describe the coding schema and key system features as well as several development challenges, including data integration, development of a final data structure from three separate ontologies, and ways to develop consensus about codes among program staff.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HITS search page.
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814302&req=5

rvt022-F1: HITS search page.

Mentions: The search screen is divided into three main areas: grant information (grant number, institution, principal investigator, program officer, etc.); document search, where the user chooses the artifacts that are searched (progress reports, program notes, title, abstract, specific aims, etc.); and tag search, where the user can search on existing tags within the system (Fig. 1). Tags are structured codes that a user assigns to a particular grant and are discussed further in Section 4.3. The search function can be used to either identify grants that have already been linked to certain tags or to identify grants that the user wants to tag.Figure 1.


Greatest 'HITS': A new tool for tracking impacts at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Drew CH, Pettibone KG, Ruben E - Res Eval (2013)

HITS search page.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814302&req=5

rvt022-F1: HITS search page.
Mentions: The search screen is divided into three main areas: grant information (grant number, institution, principal investigator, program officer, etc.); document search, where the user chooses the artifacts that are searched (progress reports, program notes, title, abstract, specific aims, etc.); and tag search, where the user can search on existing tags within the system (Fig. 1). Tags are structured codes that a user assigns to a particular grant and are discussed further in Section 4.3. The search function can be used to either identify grants that have already been linked to certain tags or to identify grants that the user wants to tag.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Understanding impacts is beneficial because it fosters a greater sense of accountability and stewardship for federal research dollars.We have downloaded previously un-searchable data from the central NIH grants database and developed a robust coding schema to help us track research products (going beyond publication counts to the content of publications) as well as research impacts.We describe the coding schema and key system features as well as several development challenges, including data integration, development of a final data structure from three separate ontologies, and ways to develop consensus about codes among program staff.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Program Analysis Branch, 530 Morrisville, NC 27560, USA.

ABSTRACT
Evaluators of scientific research programs have several tools to document and analyze products of scientific research, but few tools exist for exploring and capturing the impacts of such research. Understanding impacts is beneficial because it fosters a greater sense of accountability and stewardship for federal research dollars. This article presents the High Impacts Tracking System (HITS), a new approach to documenting research impacts that is in development at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). HITS is designed to help identify scientific advances in the NIEHS research portfolio as they emerge, and provide a robust data structure to capture those advances. We have downloaded previously un-searchable data from the central NIH grants database and developed a robust coding schema to help us track research products (going beyond publication counts to the content of publications) as well as research impacts. We describe the coding schema and key system features as well as several development challenges, including data integration, development of a final data structure from three separate ontologies, and ways to develop consensus about codes among program staff.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus