Limits...
Teaming up: from motors to people.

Reck-Peterson SL - Mol. Biol. Cell (2013)

Bottom Line: The science I am most proud of from my graduate and postdoctoral training would not have been possible without working in teams with other scientists.Now, in my own group, much of our best work is being done collaboratively, both within the lab and with other labs.In this essay, I will highlight my experiences working in teams as a trainee, the role teamwork has played in my own research group, and how important I think collaborative science is for the future of biological research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cell Biology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.

ABSTRACT
When I reflect on how I became a cell biologist and why I love being one today, one thing that comes to mind is the many terrific collaborations I have had. The science I am most proud of from my graduate and postdoctoral training would not have been possible without working in teams with other scientists. Now, in my own group, much of our best work is being done collaboratively, both within the lab and with other labs. In this essay, I will highlight my experiences working in teams as a trainee, the role teamwork has played in my own research group, and how important I think collaborative science is for the future of biological research.

Show MeSH
Motors and martinis: the Reck-Peterson lab building teamwork skills at a cocktail party. Seated (left to right): W. Qiu, S. Reck-Peterson, J. Huang, K. Tan, S. Zou, and A. Roberts. Standing (left to right): W. B. Redwine, M. Cianfrocco, M. Egan, M. McClintock, and B. Goodman.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814138&req=5

Figure 1: Motors and martinis: the Reck-Peterson lab building teamwork skills at a cocktail party. Seated (left to right): W. Qiu, S. Reck-Peterson, J. Huang, K. Tan, S. Zou, and A. Roberts. Standing (left to right): W. B. Redwine, M. Cianfrocco, M. Egan, M. McClintock, and B. Goodman.

Mentions: Working collaboratively might be vital to success, but that doesn't make it easy. Just as I had suffered from feelings of competition, insecurity, and worry about recognition, I saw that my students and postdocs had some of these same feelings and concerns. To foster a culture of teamwork, I invested time in talking to my lab members about the human component of their collaborations. I listened to them and took their concerns seriously. Like any partnership, collaborations in science sometimes require an investment in making the relationship work (Figure 1). Things haven't always been perfect, but I think we would all say that together we built a strong lab culture that values and respects teamwork. In fact, well before we had published any papers from the lab, I knew that things were on the right track when one of my graduate students came to my office and asked me, “Can I have a collaborator too?”


Teaming up: from motors to people.

Reck-Peterson SL - Mol. Biol. Cell (2013)

Motors and martinis: the Reck-Peterson lab building teamwork skills at a cocktail party. Seated (left to right): W. Qiu, S. Reck-Peterson, J. Huang, K. Tan, S. Zou, and A. Roberts. Standing (left to right): W. B. Redwine, M. Cianfrocco, M. Egan, M. McClintock, and B. Goodman.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814138&req=5

Figure 1: Motors and martinis: the Reck-Peterson lab building teamwork skills at a cocktail party. Seated (left to right): W. Qiu, S. Reck-Peterson, J. Huang, K. Tan, S. Zou, and A. Roberts. Standing (left to right): W. B. Redwine, M. Cianfrocco, M. Egan, M. McClintock, and B. Goodman.
Mentions: Working collaboratively might be vital to success, but that doesn't make it easy. Just as I had suffered from feelings of competition, insecurity, and worry about recognition, I saw that my students and postdocs had some of these same feelings and concerns. To foster a culture of teamwork, I invested time in talking to my lab members about the human component of their collaborations. I listened to them and took their concerns seriously. Like any partnership, collaborations in science sometimes require an investment in making the relationship work (Figure 1). Things haven't always been perfect, but I think we would all say that together we built a strong lab culture that values and respects teamwork. In fact, well before we had published any papers from the lab, I knew that things were on the right track when one of my graduate students came to my office and asked me, “Can I have a collaborator too?”

Bottom Line: The science I am most proud of from my graduate and postdoctoral training would not have been possible without working in teams with other scientists.Now, in my own group, much of our best work is being done collaboratively, both within the lab and with other labs.In this essay, I will highlight my experiences working in teams as a trainee, the role teamwork has played in my own research group, and how important I think collaborative science is for the future of biological research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cell Biology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.

ABSTRACT
When I reflect on how I became a cell biologist and why I love being one today, one thing that comes to mind is the many terrific collaborations I have had. The science I am most proud of from my graduate and postdoctoral training would not have been possible without working in teams with other scientists. Now, in my own group, much of our best work is being done collaboratively, both within the lab and with other labs. In this essay, I will highlight my experiences working in teams as a trainee, the role teamwork has played in my own research group, and how important I think collaborative science is for the future of biological research.

Show MeSH