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Microbiological etiology of bacterial prostatitis in general hospital and primary care clinic in Korea.

Choi YS, Kim KS, Choi SW, Kim S, Bae WJ, Cho HJ, Hong SH, Kim SW, Hwang TK, Lee JY - Prostate Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Because of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis technique, chronic prostatitis syndrome (CPS) with a known bacterial origin has increased recently.In the PCR diagnosis, 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive.Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The National Institutes of Health classification of prostatitis reported the proportion of chronic bacterial prostatitis, especially category II, at 3% to 10%. Because of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis technique, chronic prostatitis syndrome (CPS) with a known bacterial origin has increased recently. In this study, we evaluated the proportion of chronic bacterial prostatitis in a general hospital and a primary care clinic (PCC) in addition to the distribution of the microorganism in chronic bacterial prostatitis in Korea.

Methods: Two hundred and ninety-three patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and five patients in the general hospital and 188 patients in the PCC were enrolled in the study. Using a questionnaire, all patients were checked for symptoms of urinalysis, expressed prostate secretion (EPS), EPS or V3 culture and PCR of EPS or VB3 for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genetalia, and Trichomatis vaginalis.

Results: In routine EPS or VB3 culture, 12 of 105 patients (11.4%) in the general hospital showed positive culture, but 77 of 188 patients (40.9%) in the PCC showed a positive culture. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas were isolated in routine culture. In the PCR diagnosis, 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive. In the general hospital, C. trachomatis was the most common (49%), followed by U. urealyticum (24%), M. genetalia (16%), M. hominis (10%), and T. vaginalis (2%). In the PCC, U. urealyticum was the most common (45%), followed by C. trachomatis (34%), M. hominis (13%), M. genetalia (7%) and T. vaginalis (1%). The proportions of chronic bacterial prostatitis were 46.6% (49/105) and 67.5% (127/188) in the general hospital and PCC, respectively.

Conclusions: The total portion of chronic bacterial prostatitis was 59.3% (174/293). Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses of chronic bacterial prostatitis in primary care clinic (n=65) and general hospital (n=37). Comparison of the PCR analyses of chronic prostatitis in a general hospital and primary care clinic. The pathogenic distribution was different. The most common pathogen in the general hospital was C. trachomatis. In the primary care clinic, it was U. urealyticum.
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f3-pi-1-3-133-7: Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses of chronic bacterial prostatitis in primary care clinic (n=65) and general hospital (n=37). Comparison of the PCR analyses of chronic prostatitis in a general hospital and primary care clinic. The pathogenic distribution was different. The most common pathogen in the general hospital was C. trachomatis. In the primary care clinic, it was U. urealyticum.

Mentions: The PCR analysis showed that 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive (Table 2). In the general hospital, C. trachomatis was the most common pathogen (49%), followed by U. urealyticum (24%), M. genitalia (16%), M. hominis (10%), and T. vaginalis (2%) (Fig. 2). However, in the PCC, U. urealyticum is the most common pathogen (45%), followed by C. trachomatis (34%), M. hominis (13%), M. genitalia (7%), and T. vaginalis (1%) (Fig. 3).


Microbiological etiology of bacterial prostatitis in general hospital and primary care clinic in Korea.

Choi YS, Kim KS, Choi SW, Kim S, Bae WJ, Cho HJ, Hong SH, Kim SW, Hwang TK, Lee JY - Prostate Int (2013)

Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses of chronic bacterial prostatitis in primary care clinic (n=65) and general hospital (n=37). Comparison of the PCR analyses of chronic prostatitis in a general hospital and primary care clinic. The pathogenic distribution was different. The most common pathogen in the general hospital was C. trachomatis. In the primary care clinic, it was U. urealyticum.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814121&req=5

f3-pi-1-3-133-7: Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses of chronic bacterial prostatitis in primary care clinic (n=65) and general hospital (n=37). Comparison of the PCR analyses of chronic prostatitis in a general hospital and primary care clinic. The pathogenic distribution was different. The most common pathogen in the general hospital was C. trachomatis. In the primary care clinic, it was U. urealyticum.
Mentions: The PCR analysis showed that 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive (Table 2). In the general hospital, C. trachomatis was the most common pathogen (49%), followed by U. urealyticum (24%), M. genitalia (16%), M. hominis (10%), and T. vaginalis (2%) (Fig. 2). However, in the PCC, U. urealyticum is the most common pathogen (45%), followed by C. trachomatis (34%), M. hominis (13%), M. genitalia (7%), and T. vaginalis (1%) (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Because of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis technique, chronic prostatitis syndrome (CPS) with a known bacterial origin has increased recently.In the PCR diagnosis, 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive.Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The National Institutes of Health classification of prostatitis reported the proportion of chronic bacterial prostatitis, especially category II, at 3% to 10%. Because of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis technique, chronic prostatitis syndrome (CPS) with a known bacterial origin has increased recently. In this study, we evaluated the proportion of chronic bacterial prostatitis in a general hospital and a primary care clinic (PCC) in addition to the distribution of the microorganism in chronic bacterial prostatitis in Korea.

Methods: Two hundred and ninety-three patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and five patients in the general hospital and 188 patients in the PCC were enrolled in the study. Using a questionnaire, all patients were checked for symptoms of urinalysis, expressed prostate secretion (EPS), EPS or V3 culture and PCR of EPS or VB3 for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genetalia, and Trichomatis vaginalis.

Results: In routine EPS or VB3 culture, 12 of 105 patients (11.4%) in the general hospital showed positive culture, but 77 of 188 patients (40.9%) in the PCC showed a positive culture. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas were isolated in routine culture. In the PCR diagnosis, 37 of 105 patients (35.2%) in the general hospital were PCR positive, and 65 of 188 patients (34.5%) in the PCC were PCR positive. In the general hospital, C. trachomatis was the most common (49%), followed by U. urealyticum (24%), M. genetalia (16%), M. hominis (10%), and T. vaginalis (2%). In the PCC, U. urealyticum was the most common (45%), followed by C. trachomatis (34%), M. hominis (13%), M. genetalia (7%) and T. vaginalis (1%). The proportions of chronic bacterial prostatitis were 46.6% (49/105) and 67.5% (127/188) in the general hospital and PCC, respectively.

Conclusions: The total portion of chronic bacterial prostatitis was 59.3% (174/293). Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus