Limits...
Simple method for preventing inguinal hernias after radical retropubic prostatectomy.

Koike H, Matsui H, Morikawa Y, Shibata Y, Ito K, Suzuki K - Prostate Int (2013)

Bottom Line: The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but did not undergo the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group.The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 100% at both 1 and 2 postoperative years (P<0.0001).The procedure is easy to perform and produces excellent outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Inguinal hernias often occur after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). We present a novel and simple technique for preventing inguinal hernias after RRP, which any surgeon can complete within a few minutes.

Methods: A total of 230 Japanese prostate cancer patients underwent RRP between January 2007 and September 2011. From July 2009, 115 patients underwent inguinal hernia prevention procedures at the same time as RRP. In this procedure, we released approximately 5 cm of the bilateral vas deferens and spermatic vessels from the peritoneum. In cases in which the processus vaginalis had spread into the abdomen, we ligated it close to the peritoneal cavity and then transected it. The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but did not undergo the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group. The incidence rate of postoperative inguinal hernia was compared between the 2 groups.

Results: Inguinal hernias developed during the postoperative follow-up period in 18 of the 115 control patients (15.7%) (median duration, 50 months). The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 89.6% and 84.1% at 1 and 2 postoperative years, respectively. In contrast, only 1 of the 115 patients (0.87%) who underwent the hernia prevention procedure developed an inguinal hernia during the follow-up period (median duration, 27 months). The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 100% at both 1 and 2 postoperative years (P<0.0001).

Conclusions: We developed a simple method for preventing post-RRP inguinal hernias. The procedure is easy to perform and produces excellent outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Our hernia prevention technique. (A) The right spermatic cord covered with the spermatic sheath. (B) The spermatic sheath is opened, and then approximately 5 cm of the vas deferens is released from the peritoneum. (C) Next, approximately 5 cm of the spermatic vessels are released from the peritoneum. (D) The thin section of tissue between the vas deferens and the spermatic vessels is removed. (E) In cases involving a thick processus vaginalis (or a processus vaginalis that protrudes into the abdomen), we ligate the processus vaginalis close to the peritoneal cavity and then transect it.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814116&req=5

f1-pi_1-2-76-05: Our hernia prevention technique. (A) The right spermatic cord covered with the spermatic sheath. (B) The spermatic sheath is opened, and then approximately 5 cm of the vas deferens is released from the peritoneum. (C) Next, approximately 5 cm of the spermatic vessels are released from the peritoneum. (D) The thin section of tissue between the vas deferens and the spermatic vessels is removed. (E) In cases involving a thick processus vaginalis (or a processus vaginalis that protrudes into the abdomen), we ligate the processus vaginalis close to the peritoneal cavity and then transect it.

Mentions: A total of 230 Japanese prostate cancer patients underwent RRP between January 2007 and September 2011. Of these patients, 17.8% underwent nerve-sparing surgery, and all of them underwent bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection, which was limited to the obturator region. From July 2009, 115 patients underwent our IH prevention procedure at the same time as RRP. In this procedure, we opened the spermatic sheath, and then released approximately 5 cm of the bilateral vas deferens and spermatic vessels from the peritoneum. Finally, we removed the thin strips of tissue separating the vas deferens, spermatic vessels, and the peritoneum. In cases in which the processus vaginalis had spread towards the internal inguinal ring, we ligated it close to the peritoneal cavity and then transected it. The distal part of the processus vaginalis was left undisturbed. The morphology of the processus vaginalis varied among the patients. Many patients only had a thin tissue cord, whereas others had a thin but protruding processus vaginalis. Only a few patients had thick processus vaginales that protruded into the abdominal cavity, which was considered to be suggestive of a subclinical or even clinical IH. Basically, we first performed the same procedure regardless of the appearance of the processus vaginalis. However, when the processus vaginalis was thick and protruded into the abdominal cavity, the protruding section was carefully returned to the peritoneal cavity before the processus vaginalis was ligated (Fig. 1). The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but not the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group. The incidence rates of postoperative IH were then compared between the 2 groups. To assess IH after RRP, the patients were subjected to follow-up examinations at about 3-month intervals, during which they were asked whether they were experiencing any bulging around the groin and a physical examination was performed. The differences between the patient characteristics of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and/or the Student t-test. We assessed the cumulative IH incidence on the intervention side over time and compared it with that on the control side using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier plots. The significance of the difference between the sides was analyzed using the log rank (Mantel-Cox) test.


Simple method for preventing inguinal hernias after radical retropubic prostatectomy.

Koike H, Matsui H, Morikawa Y, Shibata Y, Ito K, Suzuki K - Prostate Int (2013)

Our hernia prevention technique. (A) The right spermatic cord covered with the spermatic sheath. (B) The spermatic sheath is opened, and then approximately 5 cm of the vas deferens is released from the peritoneum. (C) Next, approximately 5 cm of the spermatic vessels are released from the peritoneum. (D) The thin section of tissue between the vas deferens and the spermatic vessels is removed. (E) In cases involving a thick processus vaginalis (or a processus vaginalis that protrudes into the abdomen), we ligate the processus vaginalis close to the peritoneal cavity and then transect it.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814116&req=5

f1-pi_1-2-76-05: Our hernia prevention technique. (A) The right spermatic cord covered with the spermatic sheath. (B) The spermatic sheath is opened, and then approximately 5 cm of the vas deferens is released from the peritoneum. (C) Next, approximately 5 cm of the spermatic vessels are released from the peritoneum. (D) The thin section of tissue between the vas deferens and the spermatic vessels is removed. (E) In cases involving a thick processus vaginalis (or a processus vaginalis that protrudes into the abdomen), we ligate the processus vaginalis close to the peritoneal cavity and then transect it.
Mentions: A total of 230 Japanese prostate cancer patients underwent RRP between January 2007 and September 2011. Of these patients, 17.8% underwent nerve-sparing surgery, and all of them underwent bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection, which was limited to the obturator region. From July 2009, 115 patients underwent our IH prevention procedure at the same time as RRP. In this procedure, we opened the spermatic sheath, and then released approximately 5 cm of the bilateral vas deferens and spermatic vessels from the peritoneum. Finally, we removed the thin strips of tissue separating the vas deferens, spermatic vessels, and the peritoneum. In cases in which the processus vaginalis had spread towards the internal inguinal ring, we ligated it close to the peritoneal cavity and then transected it. The distal part of the processus vaginalis was left undisturbed. The morphology of the processus vaginalis varied among the patients. Many patients only had a thin tissue cord, whereas others had a thin but protruding processus vaginalis. Only a few patients had thick processus vaginales that protruded into the abdominal cavity, which was considered to be suggestive of a subclinical or even clinical IH. Basically, we first performed the same procedure regardless of the appearance of the processus vaginalis. However, when the processus vaginalis was thick and protruded into the abdominal cavity, the protruding section was carefully returned to the peritoneal cavity before the processus vaginalis was ligated (Fig. 1). The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but not the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group. The incidence rates of postoperative IH were then compared between the 2 groups. To assess IH after RRP, the patients were subjected to follow-up examinations at about 3-month intervals, during which they were asked whether they were experiencing any bulging around the groin and a physical examination was performed. The differences between the patient characteristics of the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and/or the Student t-test. We assessed the cumulative IH incidence on the intervention side over time and compared it with that on the control side using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier plots. The significance of the difference between the sides was analyzed using the log rank (Mantel-Cox) test.

Bottom Line: The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but did not undergo the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group.The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 100% at both 1 and 2 postoperative years (P<0.0001).The procedure is easy to perform and produces excellent outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Inguinal hernias often occur after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). We present a novel and simple technique for preventing inguinal hernias after RRP, which any surgeon can complete within a few minutes.

Methods: A total of 230 Japanese prostate cancer patients underwent RRP between January 2007 and September 2011. From July 2009, 115 patients underwent inguinal hernia prevention procedures at the same time as RRP. In this procedure, we released approximately 5 cm of the bilateral vas deferens and spermatic vessels from the peritoneum. In cases in which the processus vaginalis had spread into the abdomen, we ligated it close to the peritoneal cavity and then transected it. The remaining 115 patients who underwent RRP but did not undergo the hernia prevention procedure were used as the control group. The incidence rate of postoperative inguinal hernia was compared between the 2 groups.

Results: Inguinal hernias developed during the postoperative follow-up period in 18 of the 115 control patients (15.7%) (median duration, 50 months). The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 89.6% and 84.1% at 1 and 2 postoperative years, respectively. In contrast, only 1 of the 115 patients (0.87%) who underwent the hernia prevention procedure developed an inguinal hernia during the follow-up period (median duration, 27 months). The hernia-free survival rate of this group was 100% at both 1 and 2 postoperative years (P<0.0001).

Conclusions: We developed a simple method for preventing post-RRP inguinal hernias. The procedure is easy to perform and produces excellent outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus