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Temperature-responsive gelation of type I collagen solutions involving fibril formation and genipin crosslinking as a potential injectable hydrogel.

Yunoki S, Ohyabu Y, Hatayama H - Int J Biomater (2013)

Bottom Line: The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points.In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system.The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the temperature-responsive gelation of collagen/genipin solutions using pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) and acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) as substrates. Gelation occurred in the PSC/genipin solutions at genipin concentrations 0-2 mM under moderate change in temperature from 25 to 37°C. The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points. In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system. The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation. The elastic modulus of the 0.5% PSC/genipin gel system could be adjusted in a range of 2.5 to 50 kPa by the PSC and genipin concentrations, suggesting that a PSC/genipin solution is a potential injectable gel system for drug and cell carriers, with mechanical properties matching those of living tissues.

No MeSH data available.


Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solution measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. The numbers in the figure indicate the elapsed days after the preparation of genipin solution. The curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C were depicted.
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fig12: Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solution measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. The numbers in the figure indicate the elapsed days after the preparation of genipin solution. The curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C were depicted.

Mentions: To test time-dependent change of activity of genipin crosslinking, temperature-responsive gelation tests were conducted for the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solutions by using genipin solutions prepared 0–30 d before the tests. Figure 12 shows the curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C. The shapes of gelatin curves were similar for samples using genipin solution 0, 1, 2, and 3 d elapsed after the preparation. When the elapsed time increased from 3 to 7 d, the sigmoidal curves changed to J-like curves. The slope of the curves increased as the elapsed time increased and almost stabilized in the elapsed time of 11 d.


Temperature-responsive gelation of type I collagen solutions involving fibril formation and genipin crosslinking as a potential injectable hydrogel.

Yunoki S, Ohyabu Y, Hatayama H - Int J Biomater (2013)

Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solution measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. The numbers in the figure indicate the elapsed days after the preparation of genipin solution. The curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C were depicted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814099&req=5

fig12: Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solution measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. The numbers in the figure indicate the elapsed days after the preparation of genipin solution. The curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C were depicted.
Mentions: To test time-dependent change of activity of genipin crosslinking, temperature-responsive gelation tests were conducted for the 0.25% PSC/10 mM genipin solutions by using genipin solutions prepared 0–30 d before the tests. Figure 12 shows the curves obtained at 37°C after the intervals of 600 s at 25°C. The shapes of gelatin curves were similar for samples using genipin solution 0, 1, 2, and 3 d elapsed after the preparation. When the elapsed time increased from 3 to 7 d, the sigmoidal curves changed to J-like curves. The slope of the curves increased as the elapsed time increased and almost stabilized in the elapsed time of 11 d.

Bottom Line: The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points.In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system.The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the temperature-responsive gelation of collagen/genipin solutions using pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) and acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) as substrates. Gelation occurred in the PSC/genipin solutions at genipin concentrations 0-2 mM under moderate change in temperature from 25 to 37°C. The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points. In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system. The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation. The elastic modulus of the 0.5% PSC/genipin gel system could be adjusted in a range of 2.5 to 50 kPa by the PSC and genipin concentrations, suggesting that a PSC/genipin solution is a potential injectable gel system for drug and cell carriers, with mechanical properties matching those of living tissues.

No MeSH data available.