Limits...
Temperature-responsive gelation of type I collagen solutions involving fibril formation and genipin crosslinking as a potential injectable hydrogel.

Yunoki S, Ohyabu Y, Hatayama H - Int J Biomater (2013)

Bottom Line: The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points.In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system.The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the temperature-responsive gelation of collagen/genipin solutions using pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) and acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) as substrates. Gelation occurred in the PSC/genipin solutions at genipin concentrations 0-2 mM under moderate change in temperature from 25 to 37°C. The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points. In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system. The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation. The elastic modulus of the 0.5% PSC/genipin gel system could be adjusted in a range of 2.5 to 50 kPa by the PSC and genipin concentrations, suggesting that a PSC/genipin solution is a potential injectable gel system for drug and cell carriers, with mechanical properties matching those of living tissues.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Storage modulus (G′) of chitosan solutions measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. Solid line, 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution; dotted line, 0.5% chitosan/6 mM GA solution. (b) Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution measured by a fluidity test at a constant temperature of 25°C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814099&req=5

fig9: (a) Storage modulus (G′) of chitosan solutions measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. Solid line, 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution; dotted line, 0.5% chitosan/6 mM GA solution. (b) Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution measured by a fluidity test at a constant temperature of 25°C.

Mentions: To evaluate the temperature dependence of genipin crosslinking without the influence of collagen fibril formation, a 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution was subjected to the temperature-responsive gelation test. Chitosan is a suitable substrate for investigating the temperature responsiveness of genipin crosslinking because it has free amino residues and the solutions containing no genipin are stable at temperatures ranging from 25 to 37°C (data not shown). Figure 9(a) shows the change in G′ of a 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution with increase in temperature from 25 to 37°C. G′ of the chitosan solutions began to increase approximately 60 s after the temperature reached 37°C. Only a slight increase in G′ was observed when the temperature was kept at 25°C (Figure 9(b)). These results indicated that genipin crosslinking was activated with increasing temperature from 25 to 37°C.


Temperature-responsive gelation of type I collagen solutions involving fibril formation and genipin crosslinking as a potential injectable hydrogel.

Yunoki S, Ohyabu Y, Hatayama H - Int J Biomater (2013)

(a) Storage modulus (G′) of chitosan solutions measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. Solid line, 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution; dotted line, 0.5% chitosan/6 mM GA solution. (b) Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution measured by a fluidity test at a constant temperature of 25°C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814099&req=5

fig9: (a) Storage modulus (G′) of chitosan solutions measured by a temperature-responsive gelation test. Solid line, 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution; dotted line, 0.5% chitosan/6 mM GA solution. (b) Storage modulus (G′) of the 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution measured by a fluidity test at a constant temperature of 25°C.
Mentions: To evaluate the temperature dependence of genipin crosslinking without the influence of collagen fibril formation, a 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution was subjected to the temperature-responsive gelation test. Chitosan is a suitable substrate for investigating the temperature responsiveness of genipin crosslinking because it has free amino residues and the solutions containing no genipin are stable at temperatures ranging from 25 to 37°C (data not shown). Figure 9(a) shows the change in G′ of a 0.5% chitosan/5 mM genipin solution with increase in temperature from 25 to 37°C. G′ of the chitosan solutions began to increase approximately 60 s after the temperature reached 37°C. Only a slight increase in G′ was observed when the temperature was kept at 25°C (Figure 9(b)). These results indicated that genipin crosslinking was activated with increasing temperature from 25 to 37°C.

Bottom Line: The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points.In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system.The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the temperature-responsive gelation of collagen/genipin solutions using pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) and acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) as substrates. Gelation occurred in the PSC/genipin solutions at genipin concentrations 0-2 mM under moderate change in temperature from 25 to 37°C. The PSC/genipin solutions exhibited fluidity at room temperature for at least 30 min, whereas the ASC/genipin solutions rapidly reached gel points. In specific cases PSC would be preferred over ASC as an injectable gel system. The temperature-responsive gelation of PSC/genipin solutions was due to temperature responses to genipin crosslinking and collagen fibril formation. The elastic modulus of the 0.5% PSC/genipin gel system could be adjusted in a range of 2.5 to 50 kPa by the PSC and genipin concentrations, suggesting that a PSC/genipin solution is a potential injectable gel system for drug and cell carriers, with mechanical properties matching those of living tissues.

No MeSH data available.