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A numerical study to compare stimulations by intraoperative microelectrodes and chronic macroelectrodes in the DBS technique.

Paffi A, Apollonio F, Puxeddu MG, Parazzini M, d'Inzeo G, Ravazzani P, Liberti M - Biomed Res Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain.Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other.Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunication, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy ; Italian Inter-University Center for the Study of Electromagnetic Fields and Biological Systems (ICEmB), 16145 Genova, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain. To identify the correct target of stimulation and to choose the optimal parameters for the stimulating signal, intraoperative microelectrodes are generally used. However, when they are replaced with the chronic macroelectrode, the effect of the stimulation is often very different. Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other. Results indicate that comparable stimulations can be obtained if the chronic macroelectrode is correctly positioned with the same electric center of the intraoperative microelectrode. Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

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(a) AF along the 4th line (L4) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2; (b) AF along the 12th line (L12) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2. The black traces represent the brain regions crossed by the lines.
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fig6: (a) AF along the 4th line (L4) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2; (b) AF along the 12th line (L12) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2. The black traces represent the brain regions crossed by the lines.

Mentions: Moving to the AF, Figure 6 shows its behavior along L4 (Figure 6(a)) and L12 (Figure 6(b)), and for the three kinds of stimulations. In all cases, the AFs show a biphasic trend. The two phases along the line indicate that the same fiber may be excited in the region where the AF is positive and inhibited where the AF is negative. This is in agreement with theoretical and experimental results [25] reporting activation or inhibition of the fibers during the DBS stimulation, depending on whether the electrophysiological recordings were made on the soma or on the axon.


A numerical study to compare stimulations by intraoperative microelectrodes and chronic macroelectrodes in the DBS technique.

Paffi A, Apollonio F, Puxeddu MG, Parazzini M, d'Inzeo G, Ravazzani P, Liberti M - Biomed Res Int (2013)

(a) AF along the 4th line (L4) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2; (b) AF along the 12th line (L12) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2. The black traces represent the brain regions crossed by the lines.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814092&req=5

fig6: (a) AF along the 4th line (L4) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2; (b) AF along the 12th line (L12) under the stimulations with the macroelectrode, the microelectrode in position 1, and the microelectrode in position 2. The black traces represent the brain regions crossed by the lines.
Mentions: Moving to the AF, Figure 6 shows its behavior along L4 (Figure 6(a)) and L12 (Figure 6(b)), and for the three kinds of stimulations. In all cases, the AFs show a biphasic trend. The two phases along the line indicate that the same fiber may be excited in the region where the AF is positive and inhibited where the AF is negative. This is in agreement with theoretical and experimental results [25] reporting activation or inhibition of the fibers during the DBS stimulation, depending on whether the electrophysiological recordings were made on the soma or on the axon.

Bottom Line: Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain.Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other.Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunication, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy ; Italian Inter-University Center for the Study of Electromagnetic Fields and Biological Systems (ICEmB), 16145 Genova, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain. To identify the correct target of stimulation and to choose the optimal parameters for the stimulating signal, intraoperative microelectrodes are generally used. However, when they are replaced with the chronic macroelectrode, the effect of the stimulation is often very different. Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other. Results indicate that comparable stimulations can be obtained if the chronic macroelectrode is correctly positioned with the same electric center of the intraoperative microelectrode. Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus