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A numerical study to compare stimulations by intraoperative microelectrodes and chronic macroelectrodes in the DBS technique.

Paffi A, Apollonio F, Puxeddu MG, Parazzini M, d'Inzeo G, Ravazzani P, Liberti M - Biomed Res Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain.Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other.Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunication, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy ; Italian Inter-University Center for the Study of Electromagnetic Fields and Biological Systems (ICEmB), 16145 Genova, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain. To identify the correct target of stimulation and to choose the optimal parameters for the stimulating signal, intraoperative microelectrodes are generally used. However, when they are replaced with the chronic macroelectrode, the effect of the stimulation is often very different. Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other. Results indicate that comparable stimulations can be obtained if the chronic macroelectrode is correctly positioned with the same electric center of the intraoperative microelectrode. Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

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(a) 3D dosimetric model; (b) set of 12 lines representative of the neuronal fibers connecting the STN to the Gp and passing through the IC.
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fig1: (a) 3D dosimetric model; (b) set of 12 lines representative of the neuronal fibers connecting the STN to the Gp and passing through the IC.

Mentions: The used 3D model, obtained from clinician MRI data, is reported in Figure 1(a). The model of the basal ganglia encompasses STN, Gp, and the internal capsule (IC). STN and Gp are particularly important since neural activity between these anatomical nuclei [10, 11] is impaired in PD; IC is a white matter region surrounding basal nuclei, composed of bundles of long fibers which link STN and Gp; its anisotropic properties are due to the fibers direction [21]. The model, following the approach proposed in [22], takes into account both isotropic and anisotropic properties of the tissues, as described in [18], and in particular Gp and STN are modeled as isotropic grey matter (σ = 0.2 S/m). The IC has been modeled as a uniaxially anisotropic medium [17] (σyy = σxx = 0.1 S/m, σzz = 1 S/m) of spheroidal shape with the main axis parallel to the fiber direction (z-axes, Figure 1(a)) and added around the two anatomical nuclei into the 3D volume conductor modeled as a cubic box (Figure 1(a)), 50 cm of side, filled with an isotropic medium representative of the brain tissue (σ = 0.09 S/m).


A numerical study to compare stimulations by intraoperative microelectrodes and chronic macroelectrodes in the DBS technique.

Paffi A, Apollonio F, Puxeddu MG, Parazzini M, d'Inzeo G, Ravazzani P, Liberti M - Biomed Res Int (2013)

(a) 3D dosimetric model; (b) set of 12 lines representative of the neuronal fibers connecting the STN to the Gp and passing through the IC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814092&req=5

fig1: (a) 3D dosimetric model; (b) set of 12 lines representative of the neuronal fibers connecting the STN to the Gp and passing through the IC.
Mentions: The used 3D model, obtained from clinician MRI data, is reported in Figure 1(a). The model of the basal ganglia encompasses STN, Gp, and the internal capsule (IC). STN and Gp are particularly important since neural activity between these anatomical nuclei [10, 11] is impaired in PD; IC is a white matter region surrounding basal nuclei, composed of bundles of long fibers which link STN and Gp; its anisotropic properties are due to the fibers direction [21]. The model, following the approach proposed in [22], takes into account both isotropic and anisotropic properties of the tissues, as described in [18], and in particular Gp and STN are modeled as isotropic grey matter (σ = 0.2 S/m). The IC has been modeled as a uniaxially anisotropic medium [17] (σyy = σxx = 0.1 S/m, σzz = 1 S/m) of spheroidal shape with the main axis parallel to the fiber direction (z-axes, Figure 1(a)) and added around the two anatomical nuclei into the 3D volume conductor modeled as a cubic box (Figure 1(a)), 50 cm of side, filled with an isotropic medium representative of the brain tissue (σ = 0.09 S/m).

Bottom Line: Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain.Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other.Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunication, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy ; Italian Inter-University Center for the Study of Electromagnetic Fields and Biological Systems (ICEmB), 16145 Genova, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain. To identify the correct target of stimulation and to choose the optimal parameters for the stimulating signal, intraoperative microelectrodes are generally used. However, when they are replaced with the chronic macroelectrode, the effect of the stimulation is often very different. Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other. Results indicate that comparable stimulations can be obtained if the chronic macroelectrode is correctly positioned with the same electric center of the intraoperative microelectrode. Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus