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Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous environments using micelle-clay adsorption.

Qurie M, Khamis M, Manassra A, Ayyad I, Nir S, Scrano L, Bufo SA, Karaman R - ScientificWorldJournal (2013)

Bottom Line: Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions.Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results.The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Al-Quds University, 20002 Jerusalem, Palestine ; Department of Science, University of Basilicata, Via dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite) or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI) removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques.

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Removal percentage of chromium at pH = 1, 2, 4, and 6 using column filtration. Flow rate = 2 mL min−1, eluted Cr(VI) concentration = 50 mg L−1, and temperature = 25.0 ± 0.2°C. Volume of each collected fraction = 100 mL. Data represent averages of triplicates (standard errors have been omitted to avoid crowding of symbols).
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fig7: Removal percentage of chromium at pH = 1, 2, 4, and 6 using column filtration. Flow rate = 2 mL min−1, eluted Cr(VI) concentration = 50 mg L−1, and temperature = 25.0 ± 0.2°C. Volume of each collected fraction = 100 mL. Data represent averages of triplicates (standard errors have been omitted to avoid crowding of symbols).

Mentions: Figure 7 displays the breakthrough curves representing the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from solutions at different pH values by column filtration on micelle-clay complex/sand system as described in Section 2. Results indicate that complete removal of chromium was achieved at all studied pH values. However, at pH 1 and 2, the breakthrough point was greater than 1000 mL, whereas at pH 3, 4, and 6, the saturation point was significantly lower with a value of about 500 mL. These results are consistent with those obtained from batch experiments, indicating that the elution volume plays an important role during the adsorption process at pH values higher than 2. Column experiments showed complete removal of Cr(VI) with possible reduction to Cr(III) after the breakthrough points.


Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous environments using micelle-clay adsorption.

Qurie M, Khamis M, Manassra A, Ayyad I, Nir S, Scrano L, Bufo SA, Karaman R - ScientificWorldJournal (2013)

Removal percentage of chromium at pH = 1, 2, 4, and 6 using column filtration. Flow rate = 2 mL min−1, eluted Cr(VI) concentration = 50 mg L−1, and temperature = 25.0 ± 0.2°C. Volume of each collected fraction = 100 mL. Data represent averages of triplicates (standard errors have been omitted to avoid crowding of symbols).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814082&req=5

fig7: Removal percentage of chromium at pH = 1, 2, 4, and 6 using column filtration. Flow rate = 2 mL min−1, eluted Cr(VI) concentration = 50 mg L−1, and temperature = 25.0 ± 0.2°C. Volume of each collected fraction = 100 mL. Data represent averages of triplicates (standard errors have been omitted to avoid crowding of symbols).
Mentions: Figure 7 displays the breakthrough curves representing the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from solutions at different pH values by column filtration on micelle-clay complex/sand system as described in Section 2. Results indicate that complete removal of chromium was achieved at all studied pH values. However, at pH 1 and 2, the breakthrough point was greater than 1000 mL, whereas at pH 3, 4, and 6, the saturation point was significantly lower with a value of about 500 mL. These results are consistent with those obtained from batch experiments, indicating that the elution volume plays an important role during the adsorption process at pH values higher than 2. Column experiments showed complete removal of Cr(VI) with possible reduction to Cr(III) after the breakthrough points.

Bottom Line: Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions.Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results.The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Al-Quds University, 20002 Jerusalem, Palestine ; Department of Science, University of Basilicata, Via dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite) or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI) removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus