Limits...
Physical demand profiles of hatha yoga postures performed by older adults.

Salem GJ, Yu SS, Wang MY, Samarawickrame S, Hashish R, Azen SP, Greendale GA - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Understanding the physical demands placed upon the musculoskeletal system by individual postures may allow experienced instructors and therapists to develop safe and effective yoga programs which reduce undesirable side effects.They then performed the asanas in a motion analysis laboratory.Profiles illustrating the postures and including the biomechanical data were then generated for each asana.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California (USC), 1540 E. Alcazar Street, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the physical demands placed upon the musculoskeletal system by individual postures may allow experienced instructors and therapists to develop safe and effective yoga programs which reduce undesirable side effects. Thus, we used biomechanical methods to quantify the lower extremity joint angles, joint moments of force, and muscle activities of 21 Hatha yoga postures, commonly used in senior yoga programs. Twenty older adults, 70.7 years ± 3.8 years, participated in a 32-wk yoga class (2 d/wk) where they learned introductory and intermediate postures (asanas). They then performed the asanas in a motion analysis laboratory. Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data was collected over three seconds while the participants held the poses statically. Profiles illustrating the postures and including the biomechanical data were then generated for each asana. Our findings demonstrated that Hatha yoga postures engendered a range of appreciable joint angles, JMOFs, and muscle activities about the ankle, knee, and hip, and that demands associated with some postures and posture modifications were not always intuitive. They also demonstrated that all of the postures elicited appreciable rectus abdominis activity, which was up to 70% of that induced during walking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Asana physical demands. Biomechanical profiles: average maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint angles and joint moments of force (JMOFs) engendered during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. Hashed bars represent hip adductor and flexor, knee adductor and flexor, and ankle invertor angles and JMOFs; whereas, the open bars represent hip abductor and extensor, knee abductor and extensor, and ankle evertor angles and JMFs. Muscle activation patterns represent the average peak EMG signals generated during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. These signals were normalized to the peak EMG signals generated during each participant's walking trials at a self-selected pace.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814077&req=5

fig4: Asana physical demands. Biomechanical profiles: average maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint angles and joint moments of force (JMOFs) engendered during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. Hashed bars represent hip adductor and flexor, knee adductor and flexor, and ankle invertor angles and JMOFs; whereas, the open bars represent hip abductor and extensor, knee abductor and extensor, and ankle evertor angles and JMFs. Muscle activation patterns represent the average peak EMG signals generated during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. These signals were normalized to the peak EMG signals generated during each participant's walking trials at a self-selected pace.

Mentions: Downward dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana) with wall (Figure 4)


Physical demand profiles of hatha yoga postures performed by older adults.

Salem GJ, Yu SS, Wang MY, Samarawickrame S, Hashish R, Azen SP, Greendale GA - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Asana physical demands. Biomechanical profiles: average maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint angles and joint moments of force (JMOFs) engendered during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. Hashed bars represent hip adductor and flexor, knee adductor and flexor, and ankle invertor angles and JMOFs; whereas, the open bars represent hip abductor and extensor, knee abductor and extensor, and ankle evertor angles and JMFs. Muscle activation patterns represent the average peak EMG signals generated during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. These signals were normalized to the peak EMG signals generated during each participant's walking trials at a self-selected pace.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3814077&req=5

fig4: Asana physical demands. Biomechanical profiles: average maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint angles and joint moments of force (JMOFs) engendered during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. Hashed bars represent hip adductor and flexor, knee adductor and flexor, and ankle invertor angles and JMOFs; whereas, the open bars represent hip abductor and extensor, knee abductor and extensor, and ankle evertor angles and JMFs. Muscle activation patterns represent the average peak EMG signals generated during the middle 3 seconds of asana performance. These signals were normalized to the peak EMG signals generated during each participant's walking trials at a self-selected pace.
Mentions: Downward dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana) with wall (Figure 4)

Bottom Line: Understanding the physical demands placed upon the musculoskeletal system by individual postures may allow experienced instructors and therapists to develop safe and effective yoga programs which reduce undesirable side effects.They then performed the asanas in a motion analysis laboratory.Profiles illustrating the postures and including the biomechanical data were then generated for each asana.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California (USC), 1540 E. Alcazar Street, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the physical demands placed upon the musculoskeletal system by individual postures may allow experienced instructors and therapists to develop safe and effective yoga programs which reduce undesirable side effects. Thus, we used biomechanical methods to quantify the lower extremity joint angles, joint moments of force, and muscle activities of 21 Hatha yoga postures, commonly used in senior yoga programs. Twenty older adults, 70.7 years ± 3.8 years, participated in a 32-wk yoga class (2 d/wk) where they learned introductory and intermediate postures (asanas). They then performed the asanas in a motion analysis laboratory. Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data was collected over three seconds while the participants held the poses statically. Profiles illustrating the postures and including the biomechanical data were then generated for each asana. Our findings demonstrated that Hatha yoga postures engendered a range of appreciable joint angles, JMOFs, and muscle activities about the ankle, knee, and hip, and that demands associated with some postures and posture modifications were not always intuitive. They also demonstrated that all of the postures elicited appreciable rectus abdominis activity, which was up to 70% of that induced during walking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus