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Enhanced adaptive management: integrating decision analysis, scenario analysis and environmental modeling for the Everglades.

Convertino M, Foran CM, Keisler JM, Scarlett L, LoSchiavo A, Kiker GA, Linkov I - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort.We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding.Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Contractor, United States Army Corps of Engineers, Engineering Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS [2].

ABSTRACT
We propose to enhance existing adaptive management efforts with a decision-analytical approach that can guide the initial selection of robust restoration alternative plans and inform the need to adjust these alternatives in the course of action based on continuously acquired monitoring information and changing stakeholder values. We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort. We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding. Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER) (delineated in red in (a)) and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (b).Satellite image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). The Miami canal, and the levee system (Habitat Restoration Feature (HRF) in the north), and the Tamiami trail (b) are under consideration by the US Army Corps of Engineers for their possible modifications (backfilling, degradation, and suppression respectively) in order to restore the Everglades ecosystem. In our case study we consider five alternatives of major and minor levee degradation and canal backfilling for WCA 3A in a sequential decision process. Within the same decision process we consider variability of monitoring of water depth. We do not consider the alternative of suppression of the Tamiami trail. More details are provided in SI.
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f3: Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER) (delineated in red in (a)) and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (b).Satellite image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). The Miami canal, and the levee system (Habitat Restoration Feature (HRF) in the north), and the Tamiami trail (b) are under consideration by the US Army Corps of Engineers for their possible modifications (backfilling, degradation, and suppression respectively) in order to restore the Everglades ecosystem. In our case study we consider five alternatives of major and minor levee degradation and canal backfilling for WCA 3A in a sequential decision process. Within the same decision process we consider variability of monitoring of water depth. We do not consider the alternative of suppression of the Tamiami trail. More details are provided in SI.

Mentions: An EAM case study is developed based on the needs of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), which was developed in 2000 to respond to the disruption of the natural quantity, quality, timing and distribution of water in Greater Everglades Ecosystem by control and other water management infrastructure45675051 (SI). CERP entails over 60 individual projects with a total projected cost of over US $10 billion45. The case presented here is a simplification of the management situation facing the Everglades Water Conservation Areas (WCAs), such as 3A and 3B (Fig. 3). Over decades of flood control projects, the natural flow of water across this area has been disrupted through the development of a system of levees and canals for the development of agriculture and urban areas that support a population of over 7.5 million people. For instance, parts of WCA 3A and 3B are getting drier and wetter, with profound consequences for the unique ridge and slough peatland landscape50, and for many hydrologically sensitive species such as the American alligator and numerous species of wading birds. For the restoration of these areas, the USACE is considering levee degradation and canal backfilling in WCA 3A, 3B, and Everglades National Park. For this exercise, modeling data was considered for the whole length of the Hydropattern Restoration Feature (HRF) and of the Miami canal (Fig. 3). The spatial extent and implementation scale of these restoration alternatives (e.g., major vs. minor levee degradation and canal backfilling) have different potential to affect water levels and hydroperiod, thus resulting in varying degrees of restoration efficiency and effectiveness. Thus, managers face five different restoration alternatives (four combinations of minor and major degree of degradation and backfilling of levees and canals, as well as a “no action” alternative) that they can alter adaptively over time considering the information from environmental models and from three potential monitoring plans.


Enhanced adaptive management: integrating decision analysis, scenario analysis and environmental modeling for the Everglades.

Convertino M, Foran CM, Keisler JM, Scarlett L, LoSchiavo A, Kiker GA, Linkov I - Sci Rep (2013)

Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER) (delineated in red in (a)) and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (b).Satellite image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). The Miami canal, and the levee system (Habitat Restoration Feature (HRF) in the north), and the Tamiami trail (b) are under consideration by the US Army Corps of Engineers for their possible modifications (backfilling, degradation, and suppression respectively) in order to restore the Everglades ecosystem. In our case study we consider five alternatives of major and minor levee degradation and canal backfilling for WCA 3A in a sequential decision process. Within the same decision process we consider variability of monitoring of water depth. We do not consider the alternative of suppression of the Tamiami trail. More details are provided in SI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3795397&req=5

f3: Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER) (delineated in red in (a)) and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (b).Satellite image courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). The Miami canal, and the levee system (Habitat Restoration Feature (HRF) in the north), and the Tamiami trail (b) are under consideration by the US Army Corps of Engineers for their possible modifications (backfilling, degradation, and suppression respectively) in order to restore the Everglades ecosystem. In our case study we consider five alternatives of major and minor levee degradation and canal backfilling for WCA 3A in a sequential decision process. Within the same decision process we consider variability of monitoring of water depth. We do not consider the alternative of suppression of the Tamiami trail. More details are provided in SI.
Mentions: An EAM case study is developed based on the needs of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), which was developed in 2000 to respond to the disruption of the natural quantity, quality, timing and distribution of water in Greater Everglades Ecosystem by control and other water management infrastructure45675051 (SI). CERP entails over 60 individual projects with a total projected cost of over US $10 billion45. The case presented here is a simplification of the management situation facing the Everglades Water Conservation Areas (WCAs), such as 3A and 3B (Fig. 3). Over decades of flood control projects, the natural flow of water across this area has been disrupted through the development of a system of levees and canals for the development of agriculture and urban areas that support a population of over 7.5 million people. For instance, parts of WCA 3A and 3B are getting drier and wetter, with profound consequences for the unique ridge and slough peatland landscape50, and for many hydrologically sensitive species such as the American alligator and numerous species of wading birds. For the restoration of these areas, the USACE is considering levee degradation and canal backfilling in WCA 3A, 3B, and Everglades National Park. For this exercise, modeling data was considered for the whole length of the Hydropattern Restoration Feature (HRF) and of the Miami canal (Fig. 3). The spatial extent and implementation scale of these restoration alternatives (e.g., major vs. minor levee degradation and canal backfilling) have different potential to affect water levels and hydroperiod, thus resulting in varying degrees of restoration efficiency and effectiveness. Thus, managers face five different restoration alternatives (four combinations of minor and major degree of degradation and backfilling of levees and canals, as well as a “no action” alternative) that they can alter adaptively over time considering the information from environmental models and from three potential monitoring plans.

Bottom Line: We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort.We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding.Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Contractor, United States Army Corps of Engineers, Engineering Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS [2].

ABSTRACT
We propose to enhance existing adaptive management efforts with a decision-analytical approach that can guide the initial selection of robust restoration alternative plans and inform the need to adjust these alternatives in the course of action based on continuously acquired monitoring information and changing stakeholder values. We demonstrate an application of enhanced adaptive management for a wetland restoration case study inspired by the Florida Everglades restoration effort. We find that alternatives designed to reconstruct the pre-drainage flow may have a positive ecological impact, but may also have high operational costs and only marginally contribute to meeting other objectives such as reduction of flooding. Enhanced adaptive management allows managers to guide investment in ecosystem modeling and monitoring efforts through scenario and value of information analyses to support optimal restoration strategies in the face of uncertain and changing information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus