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Individual subject classification of mixed dementia from pure subcortical vascular dementia based on subcortical shape analysis.

Kim HJ, Kim J, Cho H, Ye BS, Yoon CW, Noh Y, Kim GH, Lee JH, Kim JS, Choe YS, Lee KH, Kim CH, Seo SW, Weiner MW, Na DL, Seong JK - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: A PiB retention ratio greater than 1.5 was considered PiB(+).When hippocampal and amygdalar shape were analyzed together, accuracy increased to 82.4% (95.7% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity).Furthermore, our results suggest that amyloid pathology and vascular pathology have different effects on the shape of the hippocampus and amygdala.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD), one of common causes of dementia, has concomitant Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in over 30%, termed "mixed dementia". Identifying mixed dementia from SVaD is important because potential amyloid-targeted therapies may be effective for treatment in mixed dementia. The purpose of this study was to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We measured brain amyloid deposition using the 11C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET) in 68 patients with SVaD. A PiB retention ratio greater than 1.5 was considered PiB(+). Hippocampal and amygdalar shape were used in the incremental learning method to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD because these structures are known to be prominently involved by AD pathologies. Among 68 patients, 23 (33.8%) patients were positive for PiB binding. With use of hippocampal shape analysis alone, PiB(+) SVaD could be discriminated from PiB(-) SVaD with 77.9% accuracy (95.7% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity). With use of amygdalar shape, the discrimination accuracy was 75.0% (87.0% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity). When hippocampal and amygdalar shape were analyzed together, accuracy increased to 82.4% (95.7% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity). An incremental learning method using hippocampal and amygdalar shape distinguishes mixed dementia from pure SVaD. Furthermore, our results suggest that amyloid pathology and vascular pathology have different effects on the shape of the hippocampus and amygdala.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Discriminative regions in classification: (a) left hippocampus, (b) right hippocampus, (c) left amygdala, and (d) right amygdala.Each figure visualizes the LDA axes on the atlas meshes.
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pone-0075602-g003: Discriminative regions in classification: (a) left hippocampus, (b) right hippocampus, (c) left amygdala, and (d) right amygdala.Each figure visualizes the LDA axes on the atlas meshes.

Mentions: We further demonstrated the effectiveness of our incremental classification method. For each of the feature vector, we measured the accuracy of the classifier with respect to the number of patients used in training data. Figure 2(b) depicts the accuracy of every classifier. As shown in the figure, accuracy tended to converge with that of the respective classifier trained with the entire training data as the number of used training patients approached to that of the training patients in the data set. We also extracted the discriminative regions for our classifiers, which provided multivariate patterns contributing to the discriminability between the mixed dementia and pure SVaD groups. Figure 3 depicts the discriminative regions on the atlas surface meshes for our classification. The anterior head, superior portion of body subregions in the hippocampus and the lateral, medial, and central subregions of the amygdala were the discriminative regions.


Individual subject classification of mixed dementia from pure subcortical vascular dementia based on subcortical shape analysis.

Kim HJ, Kim J, Cho H, Ye BS, Yoon CW, Noh Y, Kim GH, Lee JH, Kim JS, Choe YS, Lee KH, Kim CH, Seo SW, Weiner MW, Na DL, Seong JK - PLoS ONE (2013)

Discriminative regions in classification: (a) left hippocampus, (b) right hippocampus, (c) left amygdala, and (d) right amygdala.Each figure visualizes the LDA axes on the atlas meshes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3794958&req=5

pone-0075602-g003: Discriminative regions in classification: (a) left hippocampus, (b) right hippocampus, (c) left amygdala, and (d) right amygdala.Each figure visualizes the LDA axes on the atlas meshes.
Mentions: We further demonstrated the effectiveness of our incremental classification method. For each of the feature vector, we measured the accuracy of the classifier with respect to the number of patients used in training data. Figure 2(b) depicts the accuracy of every classifier. As shown in the figure, accuracy tended to converge with that of the respective classifier trained with the entire training data as the number of used training patients approached to that of the training patients in the data set. We also extracted the discriminative regions for our classifiers, which provided multivariate patterns contributing to the discriminability between the mixed dementia and pure SVaD groups. Figure 3 depicts the discriminative regions on the atlas surface meshes for our classification. The anterior head, superior portion of body subregions in the hippocampus and the lateral, medial, and central subregions of the amygdala were the discriminative regions.

Bottom Line: A PiB retention ratio greater than 1.5 was considered PiB(+).When hippocampal and amygdalar shape were analyzed together, accuracy increased to 82.4% (95.7% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity).Furthermore, our results suggest that amyloid pathology and vascular pathology have different effects on the shape of the hippocampus and amygdala.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD), one of common causes of dementia, has concomitant Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in over 30%, termed "mixed dementia". Identifying mixed dementia from SVaD is important because potential amyloid-targeted therapies may be effective for treatment in mixed dementia. The purpose of this study was to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We measured brain amyloid deposition using the 11C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET) in 68 patients with SVaD. A PiB retention ratio greater than 1.5 was considered PiB(+). Hippocampal and amygdalar shape were used in the incremental learning method to discriminate mixed dementia from pure SVaD because these structures are known to be prominently involved by AD pathologies. Among 68 patients, 23 (33.8%) patients were positive for PiB binding. With use of hippocampal shape analysis alone, PiB(+) SVaD could be discriminated from PiB(-) SVaD with 77.9% accuracy (95.7% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity). With use of amygdalar shape, the discrimination accuracy was 75.0% (87.0% sensitivity and 68.9% specificity). When hippocampal and amygdalar shape were analyzed together, accuracy increased to 82.4% (95.7% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity). An incremental learning method using hippocampal and amygdalar shape distinguishes mixed dementia from pure SVaD. Furthermore, our results suggest that amyloid pathology and vascular pathology have different effects on the shape of the hippocampus and amygdala.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus