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Magnetic nanosystem for cancer therapy using oncocalyxone a, an antitomour secondary metabolite isolated from a Brazilian plant.

Barreto AC, Santiago VR, Freire RM, Mazzetto SE, Denardin JC, Mele G, Cavalcante IM, Ribeiro ME, Ricardo NM, Gonçalves T, Carbone L, Lemos TL, Pessoa OD, Fechine PB - Int J Mol Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Onco A was associated with magnetite nanoparticles in order to obtain magnetic properties.The MO-20 presented a size of about 30 nm and globular morphology.In addition, drug releasing experiments were performed, where it was observed the presence of the anomalous transport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Advanced Materials Chemistry Group (GQMAT), Analytical and Physical-Chemistry Department, Federal University of Ceará (UFC), Campus do Pici 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. fechine@ufc.br.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the investigation and development of a novel magnetic drug delivery nanosystem (labeled as MO-20) for cancer therapy. The drug employed was oncocalyxone A (onco A), which was isolated from Auxemma oncocalyx, an endemic Brazilian plant. It has a series of pharmacological properties: antioxidant, cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and antiplatelet. Onco A was associated with magnetite nanoparticles in order to obtain magnetic properties. The components of MO-20 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, TEM and Magnetization curves. The MO-20 presented a size of about 30 nm and globular morphology. In addition, drug releasing experiments were performed, where it was observed the presence of the anomalous transport. The results found in this work showed the potential of onco A for future applications of the MO-20 as a new magnetic drug release nanosystem for cancer treatment.

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FTIR spectra: (a) Fe3O4; (b) Diblock copolymer E114Cl20; (c) Oncocalyxone-A and (d) MO-20.
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f3-ijms-14-18269: FTIR spectra: (a) Fe3O4; (b) Diblock copolymer E114Cl20; (c) Oncocalyxone-A and (d) MO-20.

Mentions: FTIR analysis is one of the most important techniques for a quick and efficient identification of encapsulated chemical molecules [13,24]. In Figure 3a, it was observed characteristic bands of Fe-O around 560–580 cm−1 for Fe3O4 as the main phase of spinel ferrites and corresponds to stretching vibration in tetrahedral site [25,26]. Fe3O4 has the general molecular formula (Fe2+)[Fe3+]2O42−, where the divalent and trivalent cations occupying tetrahedral (Fe2+) and octahedral [Fe3+] interstitial positions of the fcc lattice are formed by O2− ions [27]. The presence of hydroxyl groups that reside at the Fe3O4 nanoparticles surface was observed in the broad absorption of O–H stretching at 3411 cm−1 for Fe3O4 and the band at 1637 cm−1 is due to angular vibration of O–H. Due to spinel ferrites’ synthesis procedure performed in aqueous environment, the surface materials were covered by hydroxyl groups from water, so that the IR spectrum showed these bands [13]. Figure 3b reports FTIR spectrum for copolymer E114Cl20 showing characteristic bands respectively at 1114 cm−1 associated to aliphatic ether chemical bond (C–O–C), 1730 cm−1 due to C=O vibrations present in the ɛ-caprolactone unit and 2881 cm−1 associated to aliphatic chains. Figure 3c shows respectively bands of O–H stretching at 3430 cm−1, of C–H stretching at 2930 cm−1, of C=O stretching at 1660 cm−1 and of aliphatic ether C–O–C as principal band present in Onco A (see Figure 1). In Figure 3d, bands associated with the copolymer (1114 cm−1, 1730 and 2881 cm−1) and the drug (3430 cm−1, 2930 cm−1 and 1660 cm−1) were observed. However, it was also observed a band around 560–580 cm−1 characteristic of Fe-O vibration mode. These results suggested the encapsulation of the magnetite in the nanoparticles of the polymer-drug to obtain the nanosystem (MO-20).


Magnetic nanosystem for cancer therapy using oncocalyxone a, an antitomour secondary metabolite isolated from a Brazilian plant.

Barreto AC, Santiago VR, Freire RM, Mazzetto SE, Denardin JC, Mele G, Cavalcante IM, Ribeiro ME, Ricardo NM, Gonçalves T, Carbone L, Lemos TL, Pessoa OD, Fechine PB - Int J Mol Sci (2013)

FTIR spectra: (a) Fe3O4; (b) Diblock copolymer E114Cl20; (c) Oncocalyxone-A and (d) MO-20.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3794780&req=5

f3-ijms-14-18269: FTIR spectra: (a) Fe3O4; (b) Diblock copolymer E114Cl20; (c) Oncocalyxone-A and (d) MO-20.
Mentions: FTIR analysis is one of the most important techniques for a quick and efficient identification of encapsulated chemical molecules [13,24]. In Figure 3a, it was observed characteristic bands of Fe-O around 560–580 cm−1 for Fe3O4 as the main phase of spinel ferrites and corresponds to stretching vibration in tetrahedral site [25,26]. Fe3O4 has the general molecular formula (Fe2+)[Fe3+]2O42−, where the divalent and trivalent cations occupying tetrahedral (Fe2+) and octahedral [Fe3+] interstitial positions of the fcc lattice are formed by O2− ions [27]. The presence of hydroxyl groups that reside at the Fe3O4 nanoparticles surface was observed in the broad absorption of O–H stretching at 3411 cm−1 for Fe3O4 and the band at 1637 cm−1 is due to angular vibration of O–H. Due to spinel ferrites’ synthesis procedure performed in aqueous environment, the surface materials were covered by hydroxyl groups from water, so that the IR spectrum showed these bands [13]. Figure 3b reports FTIR spectrum for copolymer E114Cl20 showing characteristic bands respectively at 1114 cm−1 associated to aliphatic ether chemical bond (C–O–C), 1730 cm−1 due to C=O vibrations present in the ɛ-caprolactone unit and 2881 cm−1 associated to aliphatic chains. Figure 3c shows respectively bands of O–H stretching at 3430 cm−1, of C–H stretching at 2930 cm−1, of C=O stretching at 1660 cm−1 and of aliphatic ether C–O–C as principal band present in Onco A (see Figure 1). In Figure 3d, bands associated with the copolymer (1114 cm−1, 1730 and 2881 cm−1) and the drug (3430 cm−1, 2930 cm−1 and 1660 cm−1) were observed. However, it was also observed a band around 560–580 cm−1 characteristic of Fe-O vibration mode. These results suggested the encapsulation of the magnetite in the nanoparticles of the polymer-drug to obtain the nanosystem (MO-20).

Bottom Line: Onco A was associated with magnetite nanoparticles in order to obtain magnetic properties.The MO-20 presented a size of about 30 nm and globular morphology.In addition, drug releasing experiments were performed, where it was observed the presence of the anomalous transport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Advanced Materials Chemistry Group (GQMAT), Analytical and Physical-Chemistry Department, Federal University of Ceará (UFC), Campus do Pici 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. fechine@ufc.br.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the investigation and development of a novel magnetic drug delivery nanosystem (labeled as MO-20) for cancer therapy. The drug employed was oncocalyxone A (onco A), which was isolated from Auxemma oncocalyx, an endemic Brazilian plant. It has a series of pharmacological properties: antioxidant, cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and antiplatelet. Onco A was associated with magnetite nanoparticles in order to obtain magnetic properties. The components of MO-20 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, TEM and Magnetization curves. The MO-20 presented a size of about 30 nm and globular morphology. In addition, drug releasing experiments were performed, where it was observed the presence of the anomalous transport. The results found in this work showed the potential of onco A for future applications of the MO-20 as a new magnetic drug release nanosystem for cancer treatment.

Show MeSH