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The characterisation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

Cao J, Ng ES, McNaughton D, Stanley EG, Elefanty AG, Tobin MJ, Heraud P - Int J Mol Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy shows potential as a benign, objective and rapid tool to screen pluripotent and multipotent stem cells for clinical use.It offers a new experimental approach that provides a holistic measurement of macromolecular composition such that a signature representing the internal cellular phenotype is obtained.The use of this technique therefore contributes information that is complementary to that acquired by conventional genetic and immunohistochemical methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia. phil.heraud@monash.edu.

ABSTRACT
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy shows potential as a benign, objective and rapid tool to screen pluripotent and multipotent stem cells for clinical use. It offers a new experimental approach that provides a holistic measurement of macromolecular composition such that a signature representing the internal cellular phenotype is obtained. The use of this technique therefore contributes information that is complementary to that acquired by conventional genetic and immunohistochemical methods.

Show MeSH
Flow chart summarising conventional molecular biology techniques currently used to monitor stem cell differentiation, the parameters that they measure, and their disadvantages.
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f1-ijms-14-17453: Flow chart summarising conventional molecular biology techniques currently used to monitor stem cell differentiation, the parameters that they measure, and their disadvantages.

Mentions: Before the envisaged clinical applications, numerous challenges pertaining to the isolation, identification, enrichment and purification of differentiated stem cells must be overcome [4–6]. The development of more robust screening processes is critical because the inadvertent transplantation of populations of undifferentiated stem cells has been known to lead to the formation of non-malignant tumours called teratomas. At present, stem cell differentiation is monitored via the use of a number of molecular biological techniques, which include in vitro and in vivo assays, flow cytometry, real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and microarray technologies [7] (Figure 1). These techniques not only require time consuming sample preparation, but also involve the use of biomarkers or labels, which are absent on certain cell types such as cardiomyocytes, gastrointestinal stem cells [8], and corneal stem cells [9]. Furthermore, these label driven methods have been known to reduce sample integrity by causing cellular stress and damage, thereby affecting the cells’ behaviour. Given the insufficiencies of these methods, there is a clear need amongst stem cell biologists, to implement an objective, label-free, non-destructive technique for the screening of stem cells and their derivatives.


The characterisation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

Cao J, Ng ES, McNaughton D, Stanley EG, Elefanty AG, Tobin MJ, Heraud P - Int J Mol Sci (2013)

Flow chart summarising conventional molecular biology techniques currently used to monitor stem cell differentiation, the parameters that they measure, and their disadvantages.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3794735&req=5

f1-ijms-14-17453: Flow chart summarising conventional molecular biology techniques currently used to monitor stem cell differentiation, the parameters that they measure, and their disadvantages.
Mentions: Before the envisaged clinical applications, numerous challenges pertaining to the isolation, identification, enrichment and purification of differentiated stem cells must be overcome [4–6]. The development of more robust screening processes is critical because the inadvertent transplantation of populations of undifferentiated stem cells has been known to lead to the formation of non-malignant tumours called teratomas. At present, stem cell differentiation is monitored via the use of a number of molecular biological techniques, which include in vitro and in vivo assays, flow cytometry, real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and microarray technologies [7] (Figure 1). These techniques not only require time consuming sample preparation, but also involve the use of biomarkers or labels, which are absent on certain cell types such as cardiomyocytes, gastrointestinal stem cells [8], and corneal stem cells [9]. Furthermore, these label driven methods have been known to reduce sample integrity by causing cellular stress and damage, thereby affecting the cells’ behaviour. Given the insufficiencies of these methods, there is a clear need amongst stem cell biologists, to implement an objective, label-free, non-destructive technique for the screening of stem cells and their derivatives.

Bottom Line: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy shows potential as a benign, objective and rapid tool to screen pluripotent and multipotent stem cells for clinical use.It offers a new experimental approach that provides a holistic measurement of macromolecular composition such that a signature representing the internal cellular phenotype is obtained.The use of this technique therefore contributes information that is complementary to that acquired by conventional genetic and immunohistochemical methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia. phil.heraud@monash.edu.

ABSTRACT
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy shows potential as a benign, objective and rapid tool to screen pluripotent and multipotent stem cells for clinical use. It offers a new experimental approach that provides a holistic measurement of macromolecular composition such that a signature representing the internal cellular phenotype is obtained. The use of this technique therefore contributes information that is complementary to that acquired by conventional genetic and immunohistochemical methods.

Show MeSH