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Ecology of leishmaniasis in the South of France. 22. Reliability and representativeness of 12 Phlebotomus ariasi, P. perniciosus and Sergentomyia minuta (Diptera: Psychodidae) sampling stations in Vallespir (eastern French Pyrenees region).

Rioux JA, Carron S, Dereure J, Périères J, Zeraia L, Franquet E, Babinot M, Gállego M, Prudhomme J - Parasite (2013)

Bottom Line: Each station included a retaining wall and the surrounding phytoecological environment (total area: 2,000 m(2)).Most of the observations obtained with P. ariasi and P. perniciosus are also relevant for the non-vectorial species S. minuta.In conclusion, future research on the dynamics of leishmaniasis outbreaks relative to climate change and agricultural-silvicultural modifications should be very cautiously carried out, while focusing especially on the vector sampling quality and the use of phytoecological maps as vector density indicators.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté de Médecine, Université Montpellier 1, 1 rue École de médecine, 34000 Montpellier, France.

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Station No. 3. Trapping wall with weep holes (or so-called “barbacanes” in French). Inset: a weep hole containing a sticky trap. Forefront: Brachypodium phoenicoides meadow along the edge of a road. Background: Robinia pseudacacia and Quercus ilex.
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Figure 3: Station No. 3. Trapping wall with weep holes (or so-called “barbacanes” in French). Inset: a weep hole containing a sticky trap. Forefront: Brachypodium phoenicoides meadow along the edge of a road. Background: Robinia pseudacacia and Quercus ilex.

Mentions: In the study area (mean elevation 200 m), 12 sampling stations located 2–3 km apart were selected using a purposive sampling method [12]. All stations except No. 1, 8 and 10 were located in wooded rural or periurban areas. Each had a retaining wall with drainage cavities (weep holes). Sandfly samples were obtained using flight interception traps (20 × 20 cm sticky paper that were stretched vertically in the weep holes) (Figure 3). From 3 June to 12 November 1981, the 12 stations were sampled on a 10-day basis from March to November (total number of traps: 4,263; total area: 341.04 m2; mean number of traps per station: 355.25; mean area per station: 28.42 m2; mean number of traps per 10-day period: 284). Sampled sandflies were placed in a 90° alcohol solution and identified. For each species, imago densities were calculated on the basis of the number of sandflies (P♂ + ♀) counted per m2 of sticky paper [2, 23, 27, 32]. The statistical analysis was focused on P. ariasi and P. perniciosus, the only confirmed vectors sampled at the site, using Kolmogorof-Smirnov, Wilcoxon and Friedman, Cochran and McNemar tests (SYSTAT®9 software) [33, 35].Figure 3.


Ecology of leishmaniasis in the South of France. 22. Reliability and representativeness of 12 Phlebotomus ariasi, P. perniciosus and Sergentomyia minuta (Diptera: Psychodidae) sampling stations in Vallespir (eastern French Pyrenees region).

Rioux JA, Carron S, Dereure J, Périères J, Zeraia L, Franquet E, Babinot M, Gállego M, Prudhomme J - Parasite (2013)

Station No. 3. Trapping wall with weep holes (or so-called “barbacanes” in French). Inset: a weep hole containing a sticky trap. Forefront: Brachypodium phoenicoides meadow along the edge of a road. Background: Robinia pseudacacia and Quercus ilex.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3794702&req=5

Figure 3: Station No. 3. Trapping wall with weep holes (or so-called “barbacanes” in French). Inset: a weep hole containing a sticky trap. Forefront: Brachypodium phoenicoides meadow along the edge of a road. Background: Robinia pseudacacia and Quercus ilex.
Mentions: In the study area (mean elevation 200 m), 12 sampling stations located 2–3 km apart were selected using a purposive sampling method [12]. All stations except No. 1, 8 and 10 were located in wooded rural or periurban areas. Each had a retaining wall with drainage cavities (weep holes). Sandfly samples were obtained using flight interception traps (20 × 20 cm sticky paper that were stretched vertically in the weep holes) (Figure 3). From 3 June to 12 November 1981, the 12 stations were sampled on a 10-day basis from March to November (total number of traps: 4,263; total area: 341.04 m2; mean number of traps per station: 355.25; mean area per station: 28.42 m2; mean number of traps per 10-day period: 284). Sampled sandflies were placed in a 90° alcohol solution and identified. For each species, imago densities were calculated on the basis of the number of sandflies (P♂ + ♀) counted per m2 of sticky paper [2, 23, 27, 32]. The statistical analysis was focused on P. ariasi and P. perniciosus, the only confirmed vectors sampled at the site, using Kolmogorof-Smirnov, Wilcoxon and Friedman, Cochran and McNemar tests (SYSTAT®9 software) [33, 35].Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Each station included a retaining wall and the surrounding phytoecological environment (total area: 2,000 m(2)).Most of the observations obtained with P. ariasi and P. perniciosus are also relevant for the non-vectorial species S. minuta.In conclusion, future research on the dynamics of leishmaniasis outbreaks relative to climate change and agricultural-silvicultural modifications should be very cautiously carried out, while focusing especially on the vector sampling quality and the use of phytoecological maps as vector density indicators.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté de Médecine, Université Montpellier 1, 1 rue École de médecine, 34000 Montpellier, France.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus