Limits...
Relatively preserved knowledge of music in semantic dementia.

Hailstone JC, Omar R, Warren JD - J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. (2009)

Bottom Line: The brain basis for music knowledge and the effects of disease on music cognition are poorly understood.Here we present evidence for relatively preserved knowledge of music in a musically untrained patient with semantic dementia and characteristic asymmetric anterior temporal lobe atrophy.Our findings suggest that music is partly separable neuropsychologically and anatomically from other semantic domains, with implications for the clinical management of patients with brain disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

ABSTRACT
The brain basis for music knowledge and the effects of disease on music cognition are poorly understood. Here we present evidence for relatively preserved knowledge of music in a musically untrained patient with semantic dementia and characteristic asymmetric anterior temporal lobe atrophy. Our findings suggest that music is partly separable neuropsychologically and anatomically from other semantic domains, with implications for the clinical management of patients with brain disease.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of musical continuations provided by the patient for pop songs, well-known “British” tunes and nursery rhymes. For each tune, the “target” melody (the correct continuation) is shown above and the patient’s response has been transcribed below.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3775126&req=5

jnn-80-07-0808-f01: Examples of musical continuations provided by the patient for pop songs, well-known “British” tunes and nursery rhymes. For each tune, the “target” melody (the correct continuation) is shown above and the patient’s response has been transcribed below.

Mentions: The patient sang an accurate (unambiguous) continuation of the melody for 25 of the 40 tunes (figure 1; supplementary table 2): 7 of the 10 pop songs, 6 of the 10 nursery rhymes and 12 of the 20 ‘British’ tunes. Her performance on ‘British’ tunes was comparable or somewhat inferior to recognition performance of the older control subjects (mean control score 13 out of 20, range 12–16). The patient generally sang the tunes to the syllable ‘do’, producing accompanying lyrics for three pop songs (average 5.3 words) and five nursery rhymes (average 1.6 words). In those cases where the patient did not continue the tune correctly, she produced an alternative continuation that was meaningful melodically (ending on the tonic or the dominant of the key) or rhythmically (ending with a long or stressed final note). This performance contrasted with her gravely impaired verbal skills. She was able to provide a verbal continuation for only 5 of the 20 spoken song lyrics and nursery rhymes (between 1 and 3 words in these cases) and was unable to provide any high frequency sentence or idiom completions.


Relatively preserved knowledge of music in semantic dementia.

Hailstone JC, Omar R, Warren JD - J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. (2009)

Examples of musical continuations provided by the patient for pop songs, well-known “British” tunes and nursery rhymes. For each tune, the “target” melody (the correct continuation) is shown above and the patient’s response has been transcribed below.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3775126&req=5

jnn-80-07-0808-f01: Examples of musical continuations provided by the patient for pop songs, well-known “British” tunes and nursery rhymes. For each tune, the “target” melody (the correct continuation) is shown above and the patient’s response has been transcribed below.
Mentions: The patient sang an accurate (unambiguous) continuation of the melody for 25 of the 40 tunes (figure 1; supplementary table 2): 7 of the 10 pop songs, 6 of the 10 nursery rhymes and 12 of the 20 ‘British’ tunes. Her performance on ‘British’ tunes was comparable or somewhat inferior to recognition performance of the older control subjects (mean control score 13 out of 20, range 12–16). The patient generally sang the tunes to the syllable ‘do’, producing accompanying lyrics for three pop songs (average 5.3 words) and five nursery rhymes (average 1.6 words). In those cases where the patient did not continue the tune correctly, she produced an alternative continuation that was meaningful melodically (ending on the tonic or the dominant of the key) or rhythmically (ending with a long or stressed final note). This performance contrasted with her gravely impaired verbal skills. She was able to provide a verbal continuation for only 5 of the 20 spoken song lyrics and nursery rhymes (between 1 and 3 words in these cases) and was unable to provide any high frequency sentence or idiom completions.

Bottom Line: The brain basis for music knowledge and the effects of disease on music cognition are poorly understood.Here we present evidence for relatively preserved knowledge of music in a musically untrained patient with semantic dementia and characteristic asymmetric anterior temporal lobe atrophy.Our findings suggest that music is partly separable neuropsychologically and anatomically from other semantic domains, with implications for the clinical management of patients with brain disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

ABSTRACT
The brain basis for music knowledge and the effects of disease on music cognition are poorly understood. Here we present evidence for relatively preserved knowledge of music in a musically untrained patient with semantic dementia and characteristic asymmetric anterior temporal lobe atrophy. Our findings suggest that music is partly separable neuropsychologically and anatomically from other semantic domains, with implications for the clinical management of patients with brain disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus