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Emotional modulation of experimental pain: a source imaging study of laser evoked potentials.

Stancak A, Fallon N - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Pain was the strongest when laser stimuli were associated with negative emotional pictures.Results suggest that negative emotional stimuli increase activation in the left and right anterior insula and temporal cortex, and right posterior and anterior parietal cortex only during the period of nociceptive processing.The role of background brain activation in emotional modulation of pain appears to be only permissive, and consisting in attenuation of activation in structures maintaining the resting state of the brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT
Negative emotions have been shown to augment experimental pain. As induced emotions alter brain activity, it is not clear whether pain augmentation during noxious stimulation would be related to neural activation existing prior to onset of a noxious stimulus or alternatively, whether emotional stimuli would only alter neural activity during the period of nociceptive processing. We analyzed the spatio-temporal patterns of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) occurring prior to and during the period of cortical processing of noxious laser stimuli during passive viewing of negative, positive, or neutral emotional pictures. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to series of source activation volumes, reconstructed using local autoregressive average model (LAURA). Pain was the strongest when laser stimuli were associated with negative emotional pictures. Prior to laser stimulus and during the first 100 ms after onset of laser stimulus, activations were seen in the left and right medial temporal cortex, cerebellum, posterior cingulate, and rostral cingulate/prefrontal cortex. In all these regions, positive or neutral pictures showed stronger activations than negative pictures. During laser stimulation, activations in the right and left anterior insula, temporal cortex and right anterior and posterior parietal cortex were stronger during negative than neutral or positive emotional pictures. Results suggest that negative emotional stimuli increase activation in the left and right anterior insula and temporal cortex, and right posterior and anterior parietal cortex only during the period of nociceptive processing. The role of background brain activation in emotional modulation of pain appears to be only permissive, and consisting in attenuation of activation in structures maintaining the resting state of the brain.

No MeSH data available.


The component T-maps and component time courses of 14 independent components representing activation changes during the period of laser evoked potentials from −100 ms to 600 ms. Independent components are numbered from ICL1 to ICL14. In each of 14 panels, transversal, axial, and sagittal views are shown. Values of x, y, and z indicate coordinates of respective slices in Talairach space. Peak latencies in the component time courses are indicated by black triangles. L, left, R, right.
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Figure 2: The component T-maps and component time courses of 14 independent components representing activation changes during the period of laser evoked potentials from −100 ms to 600 ms. Independent components are numbered from ICL1 to ICL14. In each of 14 panels, transversal, axial, and sagittal views are shown. Values of x, y, and z indicate coordinates of respective slices in Talairach space. Peak latencies in the component time courses are indicated by black triangles. L, left, R, right.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows spatial maps and time courses of 14 IC components during LEP period (ICLs) obtained from ICA of 700 volumes of source activation in every subject and in each of three emotional stimuli using a group ICA. The Talairach coordinates of components cluster maxima, their anatomical labels and T-values are listed in Table 2A. All clusters were statistically significant (P < 10−6, corrected for multiple tests using family-wise error correction method in SPM8), and therefore a fixed threshold of T = 70 was applied throughout. All 14 components explained 92.7% of the total variance.


Emotional modulation of experimental pain: a source imaging study of laser evoked potentials.

Stancak A, Fallon N - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

The component T-maps and component time courses of 14 independent components representing activation changes during the period of laser evoked potentials from −100 ms to 600 ms. Independent components are numbered from ICL1 to ICL14. In each of 14 panels, transversal, axial, and sagittal views are shown. Values of x, y, and z indicate coordinates of respective slices in Talairach space. Peak latencies in the component time courses are indicated by black triangles. L, left, R, right.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3775006&req=5

Figure 2: The component T-maps and component time courses of 14 independent components representing activation changes during the period of laser evoked potentials from −100 ms to 600 ms. Independent components are numbered from ICL1 to ICL14. In each of 14 panels, transversal, axial, and sagittal views are shown. Values of x, y, and z indicate coordinates of respective slices in Talairach space. Peak latencies in the component time courses are indicated by black triangles. L, left, R, right.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows spatial maps and time courses of 14 IC components during LEP period (ICLs) obtained from ICA of 700 volumes of source activation in every subject and in each of three emotional stimuli using a group ICA. The Talairach coordinates of components cluster maxima, their anatomical labels and T-values are listed in Table 2A. All clusters were statistically significant (P < 10−6, corrected for multiple tests using family-wise error correction method in SPM8), and therefore a fixed threshold of T = 70 was applied throughout. All 14 components explained 92.7% of the total variance.

Bottom Line: Pain was the strongest when laser stimuli were associated with negative emotional pictures.Results suggest that negative emotional stimuli increase activation in the left and right anterior insula and temporal cortex, and right posterior and anterior parietal cortex only during the period of nociceptive processing.The role of background brain activation in emotional modulation of pain appears to be only permissive, and consisting in attenuation of activation in structures maintaining the resting state of the brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT
Negative emotions have been shown to augment experimental pain. As induced emotions alter brain activity, it is not clear whether pain augmentation during noxious stimulation would be related to neural activation existing prior to onset of a noxious stimulus or alternatively, whether emotional stimuli would only alter neural activity during the period of nociceptive processing. We analyzed the spatio-temporal patterns of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) occurring prior to and during the period of cortical processing of noxious laser stimuli during passive viewing of negative, positive, or neutral emotional pictures. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to series of source activation volumes, reconstructed using local autoregressive average model (LAURA). Pain was the strongest when laser stimuli were associated with negative emotional pictures. Prior to laser stimulus and during the first 100 ms after onset of laser stimulus, activations were seen in the left and right medial temporal cortex, cerebellum, posterior cingulate, and rostral cingulate/prefrontal cortex. In all these regions, positive or neutral pictures showed stronger activations than negative pictures. During laser stimulation, activations in the right and left anterior insula, temporal cortex and right anterior and posterior parietal cortex were stronger during negative than neutral or positive emotional pictures. Results suggest that negative emotional stimuli increase activation in the left and right anterior insula and temporal cortex, and right posterior and anterior parietal cortex only during the period of nociceptive processing. The role of background brain activation in emotional modulation of pain appears to be only permissive, and consisting in attenuation of activation in structures maintaining the resting state of the brain.

No MeSH data available.